For respiratory therapists, a shortage of a simple tube brings a new coronavirus risk

first_img Please enter a valid email address. About the Author Reprints [email protected] Underlying all of that was a greater uncertainty, and a gnawing sense of dread. “We don’t know — no one knows — when our max number of patients is going to be. … People are waiting, waiting, waiting to see, ‘Is this the max that we’re going to get, or should I continue to expect more?’” LaVita said. “However, the folks that we see — the patients who are intubated — their hospital course is incredibly long. They’re not just here for two days. They’re here for three or four weeks. So as soon as we hit the peak, we know we still have three weeks after that — of this — to sustain.”This past weekend, as she headed into work to unpack ventilators the hospital had received from the strategic national stockpile, her son Mikey had looked up from the living room floor, where he was building pillow ramps for his matchbox cars, and asked her why she had to leave again. “He’s only 4, so he doesn’t really understand what’s going on,” she said. She wished then that she could be in both places at once.LaVita holds an inline suction catheter. Pat Greenhouse/The Boston GlobeThe lack of inline suction catheters generated a kind of worry that expanded outward and worsened other worries. What was most useful about this particular piece of plumbing was that you could hook it up to the Rube Goldberg of breathing tubes and let it live there for days. Every few hours, when alerted by the numbers on the ventilator or lung sounds through a stethoscope, you could lower it down into the endotracheal tube — one tube inside another — and vacuum out the phlegm, then raise it up and leave it in place, ready to be lowered again. “It’s all contained,” LaVita said. “There’s no disconnecting of the ventilator tubing, it’s all part of one system.”The replacement, if you run out of the inline version, is a single-use suction catheter. “You actually have to open the ventilator circuit and insert it every single time,” LaVita went on. That means opening up a port in the breathing tube, and every time you do that, you potentially divert the rush of the infected person’s breath, spewing droplets and particles into the room. Such procedures are known as aerosolizing or aerosol generating — “a term,” LaVita said, “I use too frequently these days.”Respiratory therapists wear gear to protect themselves — gloves and gowns, face shields or goggles, N95 respiratory masks that create a seal around your mouth and nose — but still, you didn’t want to expose yourself any more than you had to. With the stay-in-place catheters gone, those risky moments added up fast. LaVita estimates going through about eight to 10 single-use suction catheters per patient every 24 hours.The change might seem almost unnoticeable to anyone who didn’t actually have to do the extra work. For those who did, it heightened concerns about their own safety and added a few more steps to their 12-hour days. Already, LaVita needed to check to make sure staff members were eating lunch. Eric Boodman General Assignment Reporter Eric focuses on narrative features, exploring the startling ways that science and medicine affect people’s lives. Tags BostonCoronavirusinfectious diseaserespiratory “Our goal is for them not to feel it,” said Paul Biddinger, the emergency physician and disaster preparedness specialist who was now helping to guide Mass. General through the crisis. It was Thursday, April 16, and he was hoping that the purchasing team would manage to secure more of these inline suction catheters within days, so there would be as little change for the respiratory therapists as possible.In the meantime, Mass. General could borrow a handful from sister hospitals around Boston where the ICUs still had a little more leeway. Soon, though, respiratory therapists would have to switch to the less efficient catheters entirely. Not suctioning a Covid-19 patient — or any intubated patient — wasn’t an option. “This kind of secretion plugs up someone’s breathing,” Biddinger said.For those working under LaVita, that was just one responsibility among many. Pushing air into the tiny sacs of someone’s lungs can be a dangerous proposition. Provide too much pressure, and the tissue can distend, like a balloon pocketing outwards, its surface growing frighteningly thin. Provide too little, and that lung-sac can deflate, making it hard to bring the next breath in. “There’s a real sweet spot,” LaVita explained.We want to hear from you: Are you a health care worker affected by the coronavirus outbreak? Please tell us about your experience.A respiratory therapist’s job is to maintain that kind of balance, watching levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, controlling the size and frequency of mechanical breaths. It’s a task of constant tinkering. The unconscious actions our body normally takes, the unnoticed adjustments that keep our blood and organs aerated, are now in that person’s hands.The newness of Covid-19 was stressful. At first, doctors had put patients on ventilators when blood oxygen levels dropped, even though the person still seemed strangely able to talk and breathe, because that was what helped with other, more familiar kinds of pneumonia. Now, who would actually benefit from ventilation was a matter of research and debate.Once a patient was on a ventilator, LaVita helped guide her staff through any uncertainties that arose. If she was on, she was the person they called when a machine started making a weird noise. She was the person who pitched in if there weren’t enough respiratory therapists to intubate everyone in the emergency room who needed intubation. She was the person shuffling the week’s shifts when one of her workers developed coronavirus symptoms and had to be replaced. Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. Privacy Policy Related: Carolyn LaVita, an assistant director for respiratory care at Massachusetts General Hospital Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe On the Front LinesFor respiratory therapists, a shortage of a simple tube brings a new coronavirus risk With masks dwindling, a hospital’s Covid-19 crisis team searches for a way out The trouble was, problems could be contagious. What had started, on the second weekend in April, as a low rumble of secretions in an intubated patient’s lungs — just the routine accumulation of mucus inside someone too sick and sedated to cough it up — seeded a different problem when the respiratory therapist on duty checked the supply closet. Normally, you’d fish out a specific sort of catheter, hook it up to the breathing tube, lower it down the person’s throat, and vacuum out the gunk, with a particular sucking sound, like sipping at the foamy dregs of a drink through a straw.But that sort of catheter was running out. When it comes to pandemic-time shortages, we tend to focus on the most visible: nurses reduced to wearing garbage bags instead of protective gowns, the possibility that ventilators themselves might have to be rationed. This instance was less stark. There were alternatives to this tubing with its crinkly plastic sheath: The ICU has nothing if not a plethora of tubes. Yet the simple act of swapping out one for another didn’t just give respiratory therapists a little more work; it could also put them at a little more risk.advertisement By Eric Boodman April 23, 2020 Reprints Related: This is one in a series of reports from hospitals responding to the Covid-19 pandemic.They had bolstered their ranks with everyone available. They’d hired traveling respiratory therapists, to stop in at Massachusetts General Hospital before moving on, riding the tides of coronavirus from one packed ICU to the next. They’d borrowed others from the smoking cessation program, which had itself largely ceased. They’d brought in students with limited state licenses, to pick up whatever tasks their training had covered so far.Even Carolyn LaVita found herself pulled back to the bedside constantly these days, to help figure out how to mechanically coax breath into lungs swollen with Covid-19. She was one of the hospital’s two assistant directors for respiratory care. Her job was to make schedules and onboard new staffers, to deal with whatever problems came up — and she’d found herself dealing with more and more of them as the number of patients on ventilators had swelled from 40 or 50 pre-pandemic to around 175 now.advertisement Leave this field empty if you’re human: It was dire enough that Ed Raeke, the hospital’s director for materials management, subverted his usual protocol, as he’d been doing more and more these days. The distributor he usually worked with couldn’t do much for him, so he’d gone straight to the source, asking the manufacturer about sending a shipment direct. It looked like he’d managed to score the 350 or so inline catheters he was looking for. “But then they came back and told us it’s back-ordered until mid-May,” he said.“We’re basically out,” he said. He was disappointed but not surprised. He imagined national ventilator use was the highest it had ever been, creating a rush for all the accompanying odds and ends. It was like a game of whack-a-mole, trying to source new streams of different products all the time, from N95 masks to ICU feeding pumps, arterial blood gas syringes, and sanitizing wipes. He’d taken to prowling through his stock rooms in the basement more often than usual, hoping that he’d stumble on a stash he’d somehow missed. Sometimes — very occasionally — he was pleasantly surprised.In the floors above him, infected lungs kept oozing secretions. LaVita’s respiratory therapists kept suiting up and going in to suction with the single-use catheters they had, keeping damaged airways clear enough to breathe. At least they had equipment enough for that. @ericboodman Who gets the last ventilator? Facing the coronavirus, a hospital ponders the unthinkable last_img read more

Studying during Coronavirus: Portlaoise CBS student on prepping for state exams in a pandemic

first_img Previous articleIT Carlow working to ensure students not disadvantaged – while preserving integrity and standardsNext article‘Discipline in the community is so necessary … we can play our part in Laois’ LaoisToday Reporter Pinterest Bizarre situation as Ben Brennan breaks up Fianna Fáil-Fine Gael arrangement to take Graiguecullen-Portarlington vice-chair role Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date Twitter Electric Picnic WhatsApp WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook TAGSCoronavirusCovid-19Eamonn DelaneyLeaving Cert Pinterest Studying during Coronavirus: Portlaoise CBS student on prepping for state exams in a pandemic News Laois Councillor ‘amazed’ at Electric Picnic decision to apply for later date for 2021 festival By LaoisToday Reporter – 30th March 2020 Twitter The Coronavirus pandemic is affecting almost every aspect of our lives at the moment.Bar those working in essential services, the rest of the population is off work and instructed to stay in their homes for the majority of the time until Easter Sunday April 12 at the earliest.While around 120,000 Irish Leaving and Junior Cert students have seen their lives turned upside down in the last month.Those set to sit the Leaving Cert, about 55,000 of them, have been particularly inconvenienced as the one set of exams they have spent the past five or six years preparing for are now in jeopardy.They have been out of the school setting since March 13 after they were closed by Taoiseach Leo Varadkar.On March 19, the Department of Education announced that Leaving Cert and Junior Cert orals and practical exams were cancelled and all students would be awarded full marks.However, with the written state exams just over two months away, the Department have been silent on what contingency plans, if any, are in place should they not be able to begin on June 3.All the time, students have been taken out of the routine that they have been used to for the past five or six years just moths before the all important exams.So, we decided to reach out to the schools in Laois and ask those getting ready to sit Leaving and Junior Cert exams how they are getting on.What their routine now is, how their school are trying to help them and whether they believe the exams should be postponed or done online if they cannot proceed on the scheduled date.Up first, it is Portlaoise CBS student and Stradbally native Eamonn Delaney:1 – What is your daily routine at the moment?At the moment I don’t really have a routine. I’m getting up each morning pretty late and trying to get my head into the books. I do the homework that is been given to me each day by the teachers as much as I can.When I have the homework finished I make myself some food and relax for an hour or two – a study break I like to call it. After the break, I try to do some extra study but it’s very hard to keep concentrated. When I get my bit of study done it’s onto the Xbox for the night.2 – What supports have your school provided for you and have they been useful?Our teachers have been trying their best to support us in fairness to them. The have set up a Teams and Edmodo account for each student.Each day we are sent our notes, homework and topics to study. One teacher even sent the notes out by letter with a packet of jellies in it too which was a nice touch too!3 – Are you getting out for much exercise?Yeah I have, pretty inconsistently but I have. Now that all GAA facilitates are closed there are less places to go out and do something but I’ve been to the woods here and there, walked the dogs and even just some home workouts out the back garden.I’m not doing as much exercise as I’d like to be doing but it’s the same for everyone else.4 – How do you feel about the decision to scrap the oral/practical elements of some subjects and give everyone 100% across the board?To be completely honest I was delighted, to be given 100% on any test is unreal especially for a state exam. But I can understand why some people are outraged.After working very hard for the last few weeks with the orals coming up only for them to be called off is a bummer but in no way is it ‘belittling the Irish language’ or anything like that, at the end of the day your health is more important than anything else.5 – Do you find it hard to motivate yourself to study for the exams as it is unclear if the exams will even go ahead as currently scheduled?Well I was finding it hard to get motivated before all of this was going on so yeah it’s a bit of a challenge.Especially due to the fact we don’t know what’s going on really, we don’t even know when we are going back to school or even if we are going back to school so it’s very hard to be motivated for something that might not go ahead.6 – Are you able to interact with your friends? And if so, how are you doing this?Yes I’m able to interact with my friend pretty easily, technology is a great these days.My screen time on my phone has increased drastically, I’m using all social media platforms, Facetime and again playing the Xbox.7 – How do feel young people are being portrayed in the media at the moment? They are being blamed a lot for ignoring social distancing guidelines. Do you believe this is a fair criticism?Yes, a lot of teenagers are getting the blunt of the blame. I’m aware that there were a lot of teenagers not taking the social distancing very seriously initially.But it’s not only teenagers, there are groups of people still floating around towns throughout the country that aren’t teenagers.Conor Goode, Ciaran O’Neill and Eamonn Delaney with grandad Ted Delaney8 – If the Coronavirus crisis continues and you can’t sit your exams in June, do you think they should be postponed or should exams be facilitated online?I’d love if they didn’t go ahead at all to be honest!But they’re going to have to go ahead regardless. It’s not fair if they get postponed and it’s also not fair if they’re going to go ahead online either but we may try our best to prepare for whatever the outcome is.9 – Anything else you would like to add?As I said, the uncertainty over what is going on is not fair on us students and stress levels are rising all over the country for exam students. We need answers as soon as we can.It can really have an impact on people’s mental health with all the stress building up inside of them which is not ideal. We simply need answers.SEE ALSO – In Pictures: Portlaoise Hospital triple number of ICU beds as Coronavirus pandemic continues Electric Picnic Home News Studying during Coronavirus: Portlaoise CBS student on prepping for state exams in… News Facebooklast_img read more

TSX dips slightly despite signing of revised North American free trade deal

first_imgDowntown office buildings Toronto elovkoff/123RF S&P/TSX composite hits highest close since March on strength of financials sector Share this article and your comments with peers on social media TSX gets lift from financials, U.S. markets rise to highest since March Canadian Press Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Canada’s main stock index dipped slightly despite the signing of a revised North American free trade deal.The S&P/TSX composite index closed down 0.15 of a point at 16,950.70. Keywords Marketwatch Toronto stock market dips on weakness in the energy and financials sectors Related news In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was down 27.88 points at 27,881.72. The S&P 500 index was down 3.44 points at 3,132.52, while the Nasdaq composite was down 5.65 points at 8,616.18.The Canadian dollar traded for US75.57¢ compared with an average of US75.56¢ on Monday.The January crude contract was up US22¢ at US$59.24 per barrel and the January natural gas contract was up US3.2¢ at US$2.26 per mmBTU.The February gold contract was up US$3.20 at US$1,468.10 an ounce and the March copper contract was up 0.7 of a cent at US$2.77 a pound.last_img read more

$724 Million for Banana Support Project

first_imgRelated$724 Million for Banana Support Project $724 Million for Banana Support Project AgricultureApril 8, 2009 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Government is spending approximately $724 million on the Banana Support Project this fiscal year, as outlined in the 2009/10 Estimates of Expenditure, currently before the House of Representatives.The Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries will continue to administer this project, which is funded by the Government and the European Union.Its main objective is to promote sustainable development in the traditional crop growing areas of the country. The project is scheduled for completion in December 2012, having started in April 2005.Among the targets outlined for this fiscal year is a Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA) grant contract for the administration, training and development of the project, as well as for the implementation of a small tools and equipment programme for 48 communities.The grant to RADA will also provide an investment fund to construct gear sheds and sanitary and vendor handling facilities for six beaches in four of the six traditional banana producing parishes.Included in the project is the rehabilitation of one major road and related infrastructure in the parishes of Portland, St. Mary and St. James.The Rural Diversification Programme is also to benefit from the project, in order to continue to monitor several contracts, such as the Banana Sector Re-training Project at HEART/NTA; institutional strengthening of micro-financial institutions at theSt. Thomas Co-operative Credit Union; and the development of agro-tourism in the Buff Bay Valley.Physical targets initially envisaged were: ongoing technical and financial assistance to improve the viability of both export and domestic banana producers; to improve productivity and marketability while reducing the cost of production; and new economic agricultural and non-agricultural activities for farmers, farm workers and port workers.Achievements of the Banana Support Project up to January 2009 were: the establishment of a Project Steering Committee and Project Management Unit; completion of several contracts under the banana improvement programme, such as the economic and financial analysis of the banana industry; banana resuscitation campaign to support the revitalisation and training programme implemented by the Banana Export Company; eight grants were awarded to seven organisations with total sum disbursed more than$39 million; and grants were awarded for Rural Diversification and Enterprise Development in traditional banana growing areas as well as to provide social and economic infrastructure to the domestic crop communities. Related$724 Million for Banana Support Projectcenter_img Related$724 Million for Banana Support Project Advertisementslast_img read more

How employers are making most of apprenticeship incentives

first_imgHow employers are making most of apprenticeship incentives As part of the government’s ‘Plan for Jobs’, there are a range of government programmes available for employers, including apprenticeships.Apprenticeships are jobs which combine practical on-the-job skills training with sustained off-the-job learning, available from entry level to master’s degree-equivalent. Your employee will get training in the knowledge, skills and behaviours that are relevant to their job and you will need to pay them a salary. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:apprenticeship, Government, jobs, salary, UK, UK Governmentlast_img read more

Infrastructure Australia to focus on highest-priority projects for nation’s economic recovery

first_imgInfrastructure Australia to focus on highest-priority projects for nation’s economic recovery National Cabinet has agreed that Infrastructure Australia will now evaluate project proposals which require more than $250 million in Commonwealth funding – an increase from the previous threshold of $100 million.Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Michael McCormack said the move will better focus Infrastructure Australia’s business case evaluation process on the key projects to help rebuild our economy and support jobs into the future.“This change is something all States and Territories have been advocating for and will improve the efficiency of infrastructure decision-making and delivery,” the Deputy Prime Minister said.“These changes will take effect from 1 January 2021 onwards and will support our infrastructure-led recovery from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.“This is about making sure the national infrastructure advisory body is looking at the most nationally significant job-creating infrastructure priorities across the country in order to lay the foundations for economic recovery.“October’s Federal Budget brought our pipeline of transport infrastructure investment to a record $110 billion, with thousands of job-creating infrastructure projects large and small rolling out in every part of Australia.“Refocusing Infrastructure Australia’s independent advice to government toward projects receiving over $250 million in Australian Government funding is an important step to accelerate delivery of projects nationwide that are critical for jobs, freight efficiency and road safety.“At the same time, the Government is committing to maintaining the transparency and quality of IA’s advice on the biggest, most significant proposed investments.“Projects falling under the revised assessment threshold will continue to go through all other State and Federal approval processes.”Infrastructure Australia Chair Julieannne Alroe said IA supports efforts to improve the efficiency of infrastructure decision-making and delivery.“We will focus our rigorous advice on Australia’s most nationally significant proposals with long-term productivity and community benefits,” Ms Alroe said.“The Infrastructure Australia Assessment Framework and our business case evaluation process will continue to support robust, evidence-based decision-making.“Infrastructure Australia will continue to take a leading role in streamlining and harmonising assessment processes and work closely with national, state and territory infrastructure advisory bodies to support the timely delivery of infrastructure projects.”IA’s Infrastructure Priority List is available at www.infrastructureaustralia.gov.au/infrastructure-priority-list. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:AusPol, Australia, Australian, Australian Government, business, commonwealth, community, covid-19, Deputy Prime Minister, efficiency, Federal, Government, infrastructure, Investment, Prime Minister, regional development, Transportlast_img read more

Ministry Moves to Streamline Activities in Science and Technology Sector

first_imgAdvertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail RelatedMinistry Moves to Streamline Activities in Science and Technology Sector RelatedMinistry Moves to Streamline Activities in Science and Technology Sector RelatedMinistry Moves to Streamline Activities in Science and Technology Sectorcenter_img Science, Technology, Energy and Mining Minister, Hon. Phillip Paulwell, has announced plans for the creation of a single entity within the Ministry, which will have responsibility for overseeing and administering activities in Jamaica’s science and technology sector.Speaking at the opening of University of Technology’s (UTech) 2nd international scientific conference at the Jamaica Pegasus hotel, New Kingston on Tuesday (June 5), Mr. Paulwell disclosed that this undertaking will entail streamlining the operations of agencies such as the Scientific Research Council (SRC) and the Bureau of Standards Jamaica (BSJ).(Related Story: Paulwell: Increased use of Science and Technology Will Propel Country’s Growth)“That activity is just about being completed. We have done wide-ranging consultations and we are at a point now, where, the Cabinet is going to be presented with a proposal,” the Minister disclosed.Lamenting the “disjointed space” that currently exists in the sector, Minister Paulwell contended that stakeholders have not been able to harness the attendant skill sets towards a national objective of “focusing on ensuring that we can achieve the (Vision) 2030 (National Development) Plan of Jamaica becoming a first world country”.In light of this, Mr. Paulwell said the Ministry has been doing “some work” over the past several months, aspects of which preceded his current tenure, in examining the sector’s various areas of excellence. This, he pointed out, revealed a “plethora” of agencies, “each with their own areas that they preserve”.“So, we have laboratory space across the country. Some are totally underutilised, and others are bursting at the seam. We, as a government, are determined to effectively join-up these activities into one and for there to be greater collaboration, greater sharing, and in that mix, we want to add institutions, like the University of Technology (UTech), because some of the work that we need to do in government can be outsourced to institutions like UTech,” he explained.Mr. Paulwell assured that the Ministry is “well placed” to ensure that the nation becomes “totally pre-occupied” with the importance of science and technology in all aspects of national life, and that “we recognise the importance of generating wealth and creating jobs at the same time”.The three-day UTech scientific conference, being held from June 5 to 7 under the theme: ‘Linking Science, Technology and Innovation to Economic Development,’ provides a forum for discussions among scientists, researchers and entrepreneurs on discoveries and innovations, and how these can positively impact  social and economic development in Jamaica, and internationally. Story HighlightsScience, Technology, Energy and Mining Minister, Hon. Phillip Paulwell, has announced plans for the creation of a single entity within the Ministry, which will have responsibility for overseeing and administering activities in Jamaica’s science and technology sector.Speaking at the opening of University of Technology’s (UTech) 2nd international scientific conference at the Jamaica Pegasus hotel, New Kingston on Tuesday (June 5), Mr. Paulwell disclosed that this undertaking will entail streamlining the operations of agencies such as the Scientific Research Council (SRC) and the Bureau of Standards Jamaica (BSJ).   Lamenting the “disjointed space” that currently exists in the sector, Minister Paulwell contended that stakeholders have not been able to harness the attendant skill sets towards a national objective of “focusing on ensuring that we can achieve the (Vision) 2030 (National Development) Plan of Jamaica becoming a first world country”.   Ministry Moves to Streamline Activities in Science and Technology Sector ScienceJune 7, 2012Written by: Douglas McIntoshlast_img read more

Nortel cash fight drags on

first_img Author Richard is the editor of Mobile World Live’s money channel and a contributor to the daily news service. He is an experienced technology and business journalist who previously worked as a freelancer for many publications over the last decade including… Read more Lawyers want more time for talks as interested parties scramble for a share of the $7.3 billion raised from liquidating fallen telecoms giant Nortel Networks.A lawyer representing Nortel filed a letter with the US Third Circuit Court of appeals asking for an additional 30 days for settlement on sharing out the funds, said Reuters.The complexity comes from how to divide the pot of cash between former Nortel units in Canada, UK, US and US bondholders.In its heyday, Canada’s Nortel was one of the giants of the telecoms equipment market. At its peak in 2000, its market capitalisation was $260 billion, but its fall from grace was dramatic. It was declared bankrupt in 2009, and then was liquidated.The argument now is how to divide the spoils from that liquidation, of which $4.5 billion comes from the sale of patents in 2011 to a consortium of tech giants made up of Apple, EMC, Ericsson, Microsoft and Sony. RIM (now BlackBerry), another Canadian giant whose fortunes have waned, was also part of the consortium.However, financial analyst Diane Urquhart estimated legal fees of $1.9 billion have been incurred up to the start of 2016.Last year, judges in the US and Canada ruled that most of the $7.3 billion should be shared out among the creditors of the Canadian parent and to its pensioners in the US. However, bondholders and the US unit are unable to accept that decision. FCC mulls expanded Huawei, ZTE bans AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 10 OCT 2016 Richard Handford Tags Previous ArticleTele2 gets EC nod for TDC Sweden dealNext ArticleVodafone, PayPal launch NFC-based payments in the UK AppleEricssonHuaweiNortel KT makes LG Electronics trade-in move Related Former Ericsson employees charged in bribery case Home Nortel cash fight drags onlast_img read more

Mobile Mix: GDPR gripes, AT&T action and 5G phone firsts

first_img Play Video UnavailableLanguageLanguageSettingsHDSettingsFullscreenFullscreenThis is a modal window.Caption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDone HomeFeatured Content Mobile Mix: GDPR gripes, AT&T action and 5G phone firsts Playing onSubtitlesLanguageSettingsQualityAutomatic Automatic HDSpeedNormalQualityAutomaticSpeed0.250.5Normal1.251.52Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%PlayPlayMuteMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00LiveRemaining Time -0:00 Watch in VRWatch in VRdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionsSubtitlesSubtitlesUnavailable Previous ArticleChina hardware company linked to Turk Telekom stakeNext ArticleNew Zealand bank abandons mobile wallet Powered by THEOplayer 2021.1.3Close Related ContentClose ShareMobile Mix hits Poland this week as Saleha attends software company Comarch’s user group event to hear about developments in AI, 5G and IoT – and a slating of GDPR. Over in Dallas, Diana covered AT&T’s annual business summit, where the US operator revealed plans to launch a 5G manufacturing innovation centre. Sticking with 5G, Kavit got his hands on a genuine 5G smartphone used by Qualcomm to develop the technology and, finally, Justin rounds up the news. Subscribe to our daily newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 28 SEP 2018 Related contentRelated contentShare VideoShare Video UnavailableUnavailablelast_img read more

Flathead Reservation Fire Contained

first_img Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Email A fire that forced families from their homes on the Flathead Indian Reservation has been contained, according to tribal officials. A week ago, the Firestone Flats fire burned 1,570 acres of land near Arlee and forced the evacuation of 21 families. Rain helped firefighters contain wildfires around western Montana late last week, but the potential for more remains. Fire danger on the Flathead National Forest remained high as of Monday, Aug. 5. However, the southwest corner of Montana still has the highest potential for wildfires. The Firestone Flats fire on the southern end of the Flathead Indian Reservation transitioned back to local Type 3 management on Aug. 3 after the Type 2 Northwest Montana Incident Management Team demobilized and went home. The fire was listed as 100 percent contained and this week fire crews will continue mopping up and monitoring the fire. The cause of the fire is under investigation. Further east, in the Bob Marshall Wilderness, the Red Shale Fire has burned 10,300 acres of heavy timber on the Lewis and Clark National Forest. The fire was first reported by the Beartop Lookout on July 18, when a small amount of white smoke began rising from an area where lightning strikes had been observed the night before. Twenty-five firefighters are monitoring the fire. For public safety, some areas and trails have been closed, particularly in the Sun River Game Preserve and along the Continental Divide Trail. The trail leading to the Chinese Wall is open, but camping is not permitted. All people visiting and traveling in the backcountry are urged to use caution and be observant of changes in the weather and fire behavior. For a full list of closures, visit InciWeb.org. While the Red Shale Fire is burning in remote country, residents of Polson got a scare on Wednesday, July 31 when 5.5 acres of land on the southeast side of town burned. The burn was sparked by fireworks and threatened several homes, however a quick response from the Polson Fire Department and other community fire services doused the flames before the next morning. last_img read more