Almost half of financial advisers think Mifid II will hurt the industry, but a similar proportion aren’t sure what it will mean for them

Almost half of financial advisers think Mifid II will hurt the industry, but a similar proportion aren’t sure what it will mean for them whatsapp Share Tuesday 14 February 2017 3:34 pm Just less than two in five (38 per cent) thought Mifid II’s impact on the industry would be neutral and 17 per cent felt the incoming bundle of regulations could have a positive impact. Read more: European Commission mulls delaying Mifid II for a yearDespite this, 43 per cent also said they were unsure how Mifid II would impact them and their business personally.”This hints at a certain level of unpreparedness on behalf of some advisers and, with the implementation clock ticking, those advisers not up to speed should get their skates on,” said Craig Phillips, head of International, CoreData Research. Around half (52 per cent) of those quizzed thought Mifid II would cause more people to shift away from being independent advisers, who can recommend a wide-range of products, to restricted advisers, who make suggestions from a more limited pool of products. Almost half of financial advisers are worried a tougher set of rules for the sector, which are due to come into force in less than a year, will hurt their industry, but a similar proportion also still don’t know what it will mean for their own business.Financial firms will have to comply with the updated version of the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (Mifid II) from January 2018. However, 45 per cent of the advisers surveyed by CoreData Research believed the new red tape would have a negative impact on their sector. Read more: How to protect your portfolio from inflation’s rising tideAlmost two-thirds (63 per cent) believe the regulation will also cause a decrease in the use of some of the more complex financial products on offer today.As for concerns on what needs to be done to become Mifid II compliant, 86 per cent said they were worried about chasing clients for up-to-date information to meet the new requirements, while 82 per cent stated they were fretting the price tag which would come with the additional administrative burden.  by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May Liketibgez10 Signs & Symptoms of Lewy Body DementiatibgezHigh TallyRemembering Princess Diana – 30 Iconic Photos Of The Princess Of WalesHigh TallyHappy Pumpkin10 Delicious Freezer Meal Recipes to Dump into the Slow Cooker – Happy PumpkinHappy PumpkinPay Day VilleRobert Wagner Is 91 And This Is How He’s Living After RetirementPay Day VilleRush Crunch30 of the Funniest Road Signs Caught On CameraRush CrunchRoof Replacement Contractors | Search AdsThe Cost For Roof Leak Repair In Scottsdale Might Surprise YouRoof Replacement Contractors | Search AdsCleverstFind Out How You Could Make Better Use Of Baking SodaCleverstEver Quote Auto Insurance QuotesCommon Mistake When Cars Are Used Less Than 25 Miles a DayEver Quote Auto Insurance QuotesEnanow12 Make-up Mistakes You Should Stop DoingEnanow whatsapp Hayley Kirton More From Our Partners Astounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comPuffer fish snaps a selfie with lucky divernypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comConnecticut man dies after crashing Harley into live bearnypost.com read more

Transferwise now lets you transfer money just by talking to a Facebook Messenger chatbot

whatsapp Lynsey Barber The chatbot will also be able to alert users of exchange rates for preferred currencies and it will be rolled out to the more than 50 countries where Transferwise operates in the future.“Our mission at TransferWise is to bring faster, cheaper and more convenient international money transfers to everyone in the world. Building the TransferWise bot for Messenger is a great step in that direction,” said Scott Miller, Transferwise’s head of global partnerships.A spokesperson for the startup said it’s in talks on partnering with other messengers, banks, businesses and commerce platforms in connection with the chatbot.It’s the latest example of a finance firm serving its customers via chatbots Messenger, which boasts more than one billion users. Online broker AJ Bell last year tested out live share trading using the chatbot technology, which was launched last year by Facebook.  Share Forget simply messaging friends, now you can use Facebook Messenger to transfer money with the latest chatbot wanting to take care of your finances.London fintech unicorn Transferwise is bringing its online money transfer service to the messaging app, allowing users in the UK to send money to friends or family in the rest of Europe, the US, Canada and Australia by interacting with automated messages that sound just like people. Read more: Just Eat delivers new chatbot “coach” to advise customers on takeawaysFacebook itself lets users send or receive money in the US, with suggestions that it may soon launch the service in Europe after being granted an e-money license in Ireland late last year. But, Transferwise is the first to let users do cross-border payments.Chatbots are also being used in other industries, including newspapers to distribute news stories and retailers to help users shop, and on other platforms such as Facebook owned WhatsApp, Apple’s iMessage, as well as within websites and standalone apps. Property startup Habito is using chatbots to make the mortgage process easier, for example, while Babylon Health is testing out chatbots to help asess health problems with the NHS. Tuesday 21 February 2017 12:58 pm Transferwise now lets you transfer money just by talking to a Facebook Messenger chatbot whatsapp More From Our Partners Police Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgPuffer fish snaps a selfie with lucky divernypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org read more

How nine City experts reacted to Philip Hammond’s NIC u-turn

Wednesday 15 March 2017 2:29 pm whatsapp Emma Haslett 3. Get rid of all NICs 4. It’s chaos 1. Watch out for other tax hikes Whilst the U-turn will be welcomed by the millions of self-employed workers, the Chancellor will likely seek to raise revenues by another route and could do so by increasing the additional rate of Class 4, which currently applies at the rate of two per cent for profits over £43,000. – Suzanne Briggs, Blick Rotheberg whatsapp It is time for an end to the roller-coaster of policy making from the Treasury. First we had a dividend tax break introduced and slashed a year later. Then we had a National Insurance rise for the self-employed reversed within days of being announced. What is needed is a long-term strategy for tax, not a serious of short-term announcements. Now that the Chancellor has committed to leave NICs for the self-employed alone, we also need a long-term commitment to stop meddling with pension tax relief. That would provide savers with the certainty that they urgently need. We also need a strategy to tackle the pensions saving crisis amongst the self-employed which remains unaddressed – Steve Webb, Royal London The principle of aligning what the self-employed and employed pay is right, but cutting NICs for the latter rather than raising those for the former would have been a much better way of achieving this. Better still the Chancellor should have scrapped National Insurance Contributions altogether, including those paid by employers. They are a tax on jobs and wages and getting rid of the burden they place on working families would significantly help lower-income households. – Julian Jessop, Institute of Economic Affairs 5. This will damage Hammond’s credibility Read more: Hammond’s U-turn on National Insurance hike plans – read his letter in full How nine City experts reacted to Philip Hammond’s NIC u-turn 6. The self-employed may still be punished – Stephen Herring, Institute of Directors 2. Awkward… It’s official: Philip Hammond has bowed to criticism and scrapped his controversial plans to hike National Insurance Contributions for the self-employed. Reactions from have varied, from confusion to outright glee. Here’s how nine of the City’s most important organisations reacted. The whole National Insurance saga can only be described as chaotic. The irony is that there are good reasons to look at levelling the playing field for employees and the self-employed, as the tax on direct employment is disproportionally higher. However, it would have been much better if… the government had waited for the conclusions of its own review of modern employment, and reformed wholesale how different forms of work are taxed. Instead [it] announced it would raise one tax in isolation, only to cancel it a week later. 9. The government is out of touch 7. Celebrate strivers This is a stunning u-turn by the Chancellor, just a week since his Budget. Whilst we welcome this climbdown, it does show just how out of touch this government is with Britain’s hardworking, already-squeezed and over-taxed entrepreneurs – the lifeblood of the UK economy. – Nigel Green, deVere Group The true cost of this decision may still be borne by the self-employed. It’s clear that the chancellor will look to recoup money from other sources and many tax reliefs will be in his sights. The likes of business property relief – used by many sole traders and partnerships to hand down family businesses free of inheritance tax – could now be under threat and any sense of relief among self-employed people could become a sense of foreboding once the autumn Budget draws near. – Sean McCann, NFU Mutual 8. Time to end roller-coaster policy making Hitting small business owners with an extra £2.1bn in tax on the eve of Brexit seemed a very strangely timed measure. Politicians always claim to value entrepreneurs and ‘strivers’ but then they keep cranking up their tax rates. The self-employed take big risks and miss out on holiday pay, sick pay and many other benefits. It is time the Treasury stopped picking on them. – Roy Maugham, UHY Hacker Young Such a high profile Budget ‘U-Turn’ will damage the credibility of the measured and methodological ‘spreadsheet Phil’. The former chancellor, George Osborne, had a reputation as a maverick capable of both an ‘omni-shambles’ Budget, but also credited with revolutionising retirement with his 2014 surprise pension reforms. Hammond had been positioned as a more considered, consultative successor. – Jon Greer, Old Mutual Wealth ​”This U turn poses some awkward questions about the government’s ability to get through even moderately unpopular policies. The National Insurance increase for the self-employed was a modest and redistributive measure which would have helped bring the self-employed National Insurance rates closer into alignment with the increased state pension benefits they now enjoy. – Tom McPhail, Hargreaves Lansdown Share by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeHealthy ZoneWarning! 10 Subtle Signs of Kidney Diseases that Should Never Be IgnoredHealthy ZoneCar NovelsRare Photos Of Diana – No. 9 Will Surprise YouCar NovelsLearn It WiseNobody Could Have Predicted What Befell The World’s First Surviving SeptupletsLearn It WiseScary Symptoms12 Scary Symptoms That Are Usually HarmlessScary SymptomsApartments for Sale | Search AdsApartments in Dubai Might Be Cheaper Than You ThinkApartments for Sale | Search AdsAspireAbove.comInside Celine Dion’s $42M Private PlaneAspireAbove.comAmyloidosis | Search AdsRed Flag Signs of AmyloidosisAmyloidosis | Search AdsHistory 10Vintage Toys That Can Be Worth ThousandsHistory 10CleverstWe Can’t Believe That The Trail Cams Caught This MomentCleverst More From Our Partners Florida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.org read more

The Fed may not have investors’ backs for much longer

Interest rate hikes ultimately cast a shadow over risk assets because the small amount of extra yield you get for taking more risk will look less appealing. But BlueBay Asset Management’s Mark Dowding points out that policy is still very accommodative and tightening will be gradual, so investors shouldn’t expect an abrupt shift.It may seem like the Fed is moving away from its support of the equity market, but Christopher Meurice at Signia Wealth says that was never its mandate. “The idea that the Federal Reserve implicitly has an investor’s back is arguably one of the most fundamental distortions in financial markets.”This means investors’ risk-taking behaviour is warped because they think the Federal Reserve will stop the worst case scenario from occurring.“When the central bank is perceived to target market stability on an equal footing to economic stability, the door is opened to mispricing and moral hazard,” says Meurice.While central bank intervention can be justified when there is a crisis, he says financial markets should simply be a source to glean economic insights. So with the US economy continuing to show promising signs, investors should not expect the Fed to continue to support equity returns. Share whatsapp Katherine Denham Some experts think the Fed might be more tolerant of volatility in equity markets as a result, and less likely to provide a buffer against their falls.“The central bank believes the market is expensive; that doesn’t mean it wants to engineer a market correction, but it is less likely to to stop one,” says Howard, warning investors are now “on their own”.How should investors react?Howard says it may be time to start banking the sizeable gains made in equities over recent years, advising investors to move into short duration bonds where you might get a lower, but more reliable return.The low-rate environment has persisted for a long time, and Nicholas Wall, fund manager at Old Mutual Global Investors, says investors should be wary given the market has been driven by the relentless search for yield. The central bank’s tone began to shift towards the end of last year to become increasingly more hawkish, and Howard says the risk to the equity premium is now the Fed itself.The Federal Reserve shocked the markets in June by lifting interest rates for the second time this year, despite a string of feeble inflation readings. Fed chair Janet Yellen defended the decision by saying it was a reflection of the progress the US economy had made.Michael Metcalfe from State Street Global Markets describes the past nine years as a “puzzle” because it has been one of the slowest economic recoveries in post-war US history, but one that has generated some of the best returns for equity markets. “This is usually explained by the super-accommodative monetary policy that has prevailed over the period, but with the US economy undeniably at full employment and inflation close to target, monetary policy looks set to lose its superpowers this year.”According to GAM’s multi-asset boss, it might be that the Fed no longer needs to support the equity market in the same way as it did in the 1990s and immediately after the financial crisis.He also points out that the relationship between the stockmarket and retail spending seemed to break down in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crash, when the US equity market surged while retail sales flatlined, which suggests movement in the securities market no longer affects consumer confidence. whatsapp Tuesday 4 July 2017 9:53 am This phenomenon, branded the “Greenspan put” after the Fed’s former chairman Alan Greenspan, really came into force during the 2008 global financial crisis, when the Fed cut interest rates in order to jump-start the flow of money into the markets.Such action caused the equity risk premium – which measures the excess return investors get from equities compared to “risk-free” investments like government bonds – to surge to nearly seven per cent by the end of September 2011.Today’s equity premium stands at 3.2 per cent, which the head of multi-asset solutions at asset manager GAM, Julian Howard, says is still attractive to investors.Howard points out that government bonds have produced weak returns since the early 2000s, while the equity premium has been higher than the historical average since 1990, meaning equities have been the more attractive option for investors for some time. And while many market players have got used to the central bank’s protection, Howard stresses that “things can – and do – change”.Fed changes direction For decades, the Federal Reserve has been the wingman to the US equity market, manipulating monetary policy to prevent the stockmarket from tipping into chaos.It was during the financial crisis of 1987 that the US central bank first came to the rescue by pumping liquidity into the financial system. Ever since, the Fed has been at hand to prop up the equity market, restoring investors’ confidence during notable events, such as the 9/11 terror attack, the 1997 Asian financial crisis, and the collapse of the tech boom. The Fed may not have investors’ backs for much longer More From Our Partners Astounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comKansas coach fired for using N-word toward Black playerthegrio.com read more

Markets hold their breath as US and Chinese trade talks resume

Wednesday 22 August 2018 12:07 pm whatsapp whatsapp Trade negotiations between the US and China are set to resume today in a bid to avert a trade war between the world’s two largest economies.Treasury undersecretary David Malpass will meet Chinese Commerce vice minister Wang Shouwen, continuing discussions through to tomorrow. Tim Abington More From Our Partners Native American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comPuffer fish snaps a selfie with lucky divernypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.com‘The Love Boat’ captain Gavin MacLeod dies at 90nypost.comKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comConnecticut man dies after crashing Harley into live bearnypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.com Share Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang said the country hopes for a “good outcome” in the talks, adding: “We hope that everyone can calmly sit down together and have earnest discussions toward an outcome that is in beneficial to both sides.”Read more: ‘Trump’s worst hour’: President in trouble as close allies fall foul of law Despite the low level nature of the staff conducting the fresh round of talks and the dollar falling from 78p to 77p this week on the back of Trump’s criticism of the Federal Reserve, there is a sense of confidence, albeit subtle, in international markets around the fact that the superpowers are holding discussions.Analyst Lukman Otungua, from online trading broker Forex Time, said: “While the possibility of a breakthrough deal from the lower level trade talks remains very low, any signs of further negotiations in the future could support global sentiment.”But Joshua Mahony, market analyst at IG, said Trump has created a “volatile” trade environment, and his latest comments have “slapped down” market optimism.”With the chance of yet another disappointing and combative meeting between Chinese and US officials, the recent selloff in the dollar could be a good opportunity for traders to look for another return to strength for the dollar as they seek out havens in the event of a likely no deal,” he added.Chatham House fellow Marianne Schneider-Petsinger said that though holding discussions was positive, she “didn’t expect major development.” “Unless the President is involved directly, deals are unlikely” she said, pointing to the tariffs introduced after the May discussions. Schneider-Petsinger said that the given the US is “unclear of its priorities, China is unable to respond.” While President Donald Trump said earlier this week he did not “anticipate much” from the talks, adding that China had “become spoiled”, the Chinese foreign ministry said it hoped for a good outcome.Read more: Boeing braced for tariff rises as US-China trade war continuesHigher-level negotiations in June with the more significant US commerce secretary Wilbur Ross proved fruitless. The US currently has tariffs of 25 per cent on $34bn of Chinese goods, a rate that was mirrored by Chinese retaliatory measures.President Trump also announced earlier this month taxes on a further $16bn worth of goods, expected to be imposed from tomorrow, with China set to do the same.US demands have previously included protection of intellectual property and a reduction of the American trade deficit. Currently the US has an annual trade deficit of $200bn with China. Markets hold their breath as US and Chinese trade talks resume read more

Labour has faced crises before, but this is uncharted territory

first_img The stories swirling around the run-up centre on the current maelstrom of fanatical support for Jeremy Corbyn, the increasing despondence of moderate MPs, accusations of antisemitism at the heart of the party, all against a backdrop of online discussion that verges on abuse.Read more: Tony Blair: Moderates may have lost the Labour party foreverBut step away for a moment, and there are valuable lessons to be learnt by looking beyond the crisis facing Labour today, back to the long and rich history of the party.Labour has been through vicious conflicts in the past. The left and right of the party are regularly in open conflict – possibly one reason why Labour has won so few General Elections. (Remove the Blair era victories and the picture is even worse.)When the party has been in power, its leaders are criticised for their accommodation with prevailing orthodoxies and for not being radical enough. Even the great reforming Labour government of 1945-51 under Clement Attlee was not immune. Many on the left accused it of being too passive, of only securing achievements early on, of wrongly imposing charges on the NHS, and of not being radical enough in other areas.The pattern is straightforward: the party in power betrays the cause and it then spends a period (in opposition) seeking ideological purity, only to return to the mainstream to win again. The path back is to elect a “soft-left” leader who can bring all sides together to make the party electable again – think Harold Wilson after Hugh Gaitskell, and Neil Kinnock after Michael Foot. And so the cycle goes on.The great cries of “betrayal” have haunted Labour leaders ever since Ramsay MacDonald helped form the National Government in 1931.In the 1950s, supporters of Gaitskell – the Gaitskellites – were in conflict with those of Aneurin Bevan – the Bevanites.And when Wilson (leader 1963-76) as Prime Minister tried to challenge the power of the trade unions, he was forced to back down. He was never really forgiven, and the approach taken by the party in government in the 1970s brought open warfare and destroyed the reputation of Labour. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStorymoneycougar.comDiana’s Butler Reveals Why Harry Really Married Meghanmoneycougar.comZen HeraldEllen Got A Little Too Personal With Blake Shelton, So He Said ThisZen HeraldOne-N-Done | 7-Minute Workout7 Minutes a Day To a Flat Stomach By Using This 1 Easy ExerciseOne-N-Done | 7-Minute WorkoutBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeMedical MattersThis Picture Shows Who Prince Harry’s Father Really IsMedical MattersCleverstTattoo Fails : No One Makes It Past No. 6 Without LaughingCleverstMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailTrading BlvdThis Picture of Prince Harry & Father at The Same Age Will Shock YouTrading Blvd Tuesday 18 September 2018 10:55 am After a summer of turbulence, the Labour party conference will get underway in Liverpool next week. Labour has faced crises before, but this is uncharted territory More From Our Partners Porsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comMan on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.org whatsapp Rowdy and divisive party conferences are nothing new. The great battle for the deputy party leadership between Tony Benn and Denis Healey in 1981 was full of accusations of abuse on both sides – and they didn’t need Twitter. Bevan levelled abuse which, seemingly mild now, was shocking at the time.Many of the battles have split down left-right lines: the role of state, nationalisation, how to deal with business and the market, foreign affairs, and relations with the US and Europe. And there has always been criticism of the party leadership being run by cliques.However, during all those battles there was always a clear way forward for both sides to gain an advantage or take back control. While the trade unions have complained against Labour leaders in power, they eventually supported – or at least did not stand against – the new leaders trying to make the party electable again. Control of the party machinery too was part of the path to power for both sides.This time is different. Without a significant change in the make-up of the membership, the moderates look destined to go silent or leave. And whereas in the debates of the past, both sides had clear common cause, this appears to now be fading.The left during those times had no truck with more extreme leftist elements. What bound the party together was stronger that the issues that divided it. Corbyn’s left is of a different tradition – the common rules of the party are disappearing. Labour’s prospects seem now, more than ever, reliant on the future of the Conservative party: how the Tories handle Brexit, and the timing of the next election. The party’s ability to reform, regroup, and evolve is no longer certain.After a history of cyclical conflict and resolution, now might be the first time that Labour’s future is truly in doubt.Read more: Labour will vote against Theresa May’s Brexit deal, says Emily Thornberry Stuart ThomsonStuart Thomson is head of public affairs at Bircham Dyson Bell. whatsapp Share Tags: Brexit Jeremy Corbyn Labour party conference NHS People Theresa May Tony Blair Twitterlast_img read more

Trump cancels new tariffs as China pledges to reduce trade gap

first_img whatsapp The news came at the end of this year’s G20 summit in Argentina, after President Trump sat down for a working dinner with President Xi Jinping of China and their trade delegations in Buenos Aires.In response to the freeze China has pledged to buy farm, energy and industrial goods, to reduce the country’s trade surplus with the US. The exact amount was “not yet agreed upon, but very substantial”, according to the White House.Further negotiations about the most contentious aspects of Chinese trade policy were also announced. These include compulsory technology transfers, intellectual property theft, and non-tariff barriers.If no agreement is reached within three months, the planned tariff increases will go ahead, the White House said. Wang Shouwen, China’s vice minister of commerce, said both sides will step up negotiations on eliminating the 10 percent tariff, according to Chinese state media outlet China Daily.President Trump heralded the meeting as “amazing and productive”, saying it brought about “unlimited possibilities for both the United States and China”. US president Donald Trump has scrapped plans to increase tariffs on Chinese goods, in an announcement that sees the year-long US-China trade war cool considerably.The White House announced it would hold fire on raising tariffs on $200bn (£156bn) worth of goods from China. They had been scheduled to increase to 25 per cent from 1 January of the new year, but will now remain at the current 10 per cent rate. The promise of a tough stance on China was central to Mr Trump’s election pitch. America’s trade deficit with China was $376bn in 2017, according to the US Census Bureau, which Trump argues hands too much power to China.His tariff campaign against the country began in January 2018, and saw a 25 per cent tariff on steel imports imposed in March.In a sign of what the trade thaw may mean for global market confidence, the American S&P 500 was up 4.14 per cent last week in anticipation of the meeting. However, the FTSE 100, whose listed companies are less exposed to the US and China, dropped 1 per cent on Friday.Michael Hewson, chief market analyst at CMC Markets UK, said it was “the best we could hope for”, and called it “the status quo maintained”. Referencing Mr Trump’s fiery rhetoric, he said, “it’s all about actions as opposed to words … as long as there’s no escalations, markets will generally look past the words”.The effect on global markets will become clear as they open tomorrow morning. Largely driven by concerns over heightening trade tensions, the S&P 500 is down almost six per cent from a record ever high in September. Share Trump cancels new tariffs as China pledges to reduce trade gap Harry Robertson whatsapp Sunday 2 December 2018 6:48 pm Tags: Company Donald Trump FTSE 100 G20 Peoplelast_img read more

Theresa May warns not to expect a quick Brexit breakthrough as she arrives in Brussels

first_img Theresa May warns not to expect a quick Brexit breakthrough as she arrives in Brussels The PM is set to address EU leaders this afternoon, where she will make a plea for more assurances that a UK-wide customs union would only ever be a temporary solution for post-Brexit trade.Speaking to reporters, May described Wednesday as a “difficult day”, adding: “I’m grateful for the significant support I had from colleagues. But I have also heard loud and clear the concerns of those who didn’t feel about to support me, and I know the concerns there are in the House of Commons about this issue of the backstop, that they do not want it to be permanent.”She added: “I don’t expect an immediate breakthrough but what I do hope is that we can start work as quickly as possible on the assurances that are necessary.”Other leaders arriving at the summit underlined the difficulty facing May, with many telling journalists that giving additional legal guarantees could not happen without reopening the withdrawal agreement – something they were not prepared to countenance.Dutch PM Mark Rutte argued the backstop was only needed because of the conditions set out by May in the Brexit negotiations. Owen Bennett whatsapp Theresa May played down the chances of a Brexit breakthrough as she arrived in Brussels for the latest EU summit.Speaking the day after surviving a vote of no confidence from disgruntled Tory MPs, the Prime Minister said she heard “loud and clear” why the 117 who voted against her are unhappy with her leadership. Thursday 13 December 2018 3:02 pm whatsappcenter_img Tags: Brexit People Theresa May Reacting to May’s comments in Brussels, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said: “It is clear there will be no changes to the deal the Prime Minister brought back last month. Theresa May herself says she isn’t expecting a breakthrough.“There must be no more dither and delay, or attempts to run down the clock in an attempt to deny parliament alternative options.” Share He said: “The deal is there because of the red lines the UK itself drew: no border in the Irish Sea, no membership of the customs union, no free movement of people.”So this is the only deal possible, the best deal for both the UK and the EU given those red lines.”The big issue is now the backstop. So we have to demystify that, get clarity on what it means, and why all of us don’t want it to be triggered.”Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz repeated the EU line that the agreed deal would not be reopened, but added: “There is also some room to have a better interpretation of what we agreed on, but there will be no new deal about the withdrawal agreement.”May delayed on a Commons vote on her Brexit deal on Tuesday, but has vowed to bring it back to MPs before January 21.last_img read more

Forget social networks – the future is community media, says the boss of Disciple Media

first_img“Our product is for communities and community hosts who are disillusioned with social media and frustrated with the owned-media tools, like your standard website and mailing list,” explains Vaughan.Community media offers some key advantages over social networks. While the latter are useful for growing an audience and acquiring new fans, control remains firmly in the hands of the tech giants.Brands might be able to post information about their products, but this can get missed in the crowded feeds of Facebook and Twitter. And if they’re trying to gain insights about their customers, there’s a privacy concern that third parties might also access and take advantage of the same data.Instead, using community media enables brands to advertise to dedicated consumers focused on their products. Vaughan adds that Disciple has no ownership over the data generated via its community apps – it belongs solely to the community owner.Social media influencers are also limited in how to monetise their audience: if they use ads on YouTube, Google gets a cut of the action, while Instagram and Facebook offer few monetisation options.As an example, Vaughan describes one Instagram influencer who had around 62,000 followers, but felt limited in how she could nurture this community. With Disciple, she launched a subscription-based app and within 48 hours made £31,000.Community media offers a new way for brands and creators to interact with their fanbase. Unlike on social, where anybody can get involved and disrupt the community, spaces that require monthly subscriptions are less likely to attract trolls and bullies. Users will be happier to share their data and receive marketing, because it will be from a brand that they care about.And it’s proving popular with politicians as a way to better engage voters – Hancock is no longer the only MP with their own app, and Disciple is also working with politicians in the US.With Donald Trump polluting the discourse on Twitter, the next President or Prime Minister might choose to forego social media, and launch an app instead. Share Monday 18 February 2019 10:08 am whatsapp In February last year, Matt Hancock (then culture secretary, now health secretary) launched his own smartphone app, imaginatively titled… “Matt Hancock”.Many scoffed at the idea of an MP thinking themselves so important that they needed an app. And there were jokes about how the app asked for user consent: “Matt Hancock would like to access your photos”, “Matt Hancock would like to access your camera”, or, if it crashed, “Matt Hancock keeps stopping”. Luke GrahamLuke is a former City AM features writer, now features editor for Tyto PR Disciple Media initially worked on an agency basis, approaching talent to build bespoke community media apps for them. This allowed the musician to connect with fans, share exclusive content, and gain data insights into their audience. They could offer this for free, or use it as a way to raise revenue by charging fans a monthly subscription for access. Disciple created apps for artists including US country singer Luke Bryan and the Rolling Stones.But the app creation process was slow, taking a month or longer to develop. And Disciple was soon being approached by people from other fields with vastly different needs, from YouTube influencers, to health gurus, to Bollywood stars.The company decided to switch focus away from the music sector, and instead concentrate on its tech and apply the product to a wider audience.“We wanted to get to the point where people could come to our website and build their own social environment for their network and publish it themselves, with a bit of handholding and support from us,” adds Vaughan.By the end of 2017, the process to create an app was streamlined down to just 10 minutes. Now anyone – brands, creatives, charities, local communities – can create an app that serves their purpose: it might be to drive revenue through subscriptions and in-app purchases, or to keep users informed and up-to-date, or to gain data insights about their audience. But 12 months on, it has proven a hit with the MP’s West Suffolk constituents, who are able to discuss local issues and contact the minister through the app. Laugh all you want, but this is an example of how direct democracy can work in the digital age.It’s also part of a new trend for community media.Brands as well as creators and influencers have spent years building communities of followers on social media, but increasingly they want to get away from the likes of Facebook, YouTube and Instagram. Concerns about privacy, internet bullying, and data scandals like Cambridge Analytica are making these platforms toxic.Previously, the only alternatives would be websites, mailing lists, and forums to interact with fans and customers. But these “owned media” tools are looking increasingly old-fashioned, and lack the mobile-driven functionality and usability of social media.Instead, brands are looking to new solutions to manage and interact with consumers – and the one with the most potential, as Matt Hancock demonstrates, is community media. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableybonvoyaged.comTotal Jerks: These Stars Are Horrible People.bonvoyaged.comMisterStoryWoman files for divorce after seeing this photoMisterStoryDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily FunnyLiver Health1 Bite of This Melts Belly And Arm Fat (Take Before Bed)Liver Healthautooverload.comDeclassified Vietnam War Photos The Public Wasn’t Meant To Seeautooverload.comTotal PastJohn Wick Stuntman Reveals The Truth About Keanu ReevesTotal PastInvestment GuruRemember Cote De Pablo? Take A Deep Breath Before You See Her NowInvestment Guru To find out more about this new marketing approach, I spoke to Benji Vaughan, founder and chief executive of Disciple Media – the software-as-a-service company which built the Matt Hancock app.“We feel like we and a few other companies are creating a new category that’s appearing between owned media and social media,” he tells me. “We’re calling it community media.”Vaughan hit on the idea for Disciple while working in the music industry. He was a producer and partner at a record label, but noticed that it was difficult for artists to interact with their fans.“It was becoming increasingly hard to have a consistent relationship with the fanbase and work out who they were. We’d have hundreds of thousands of likes on one platform, millions of views on another, but had no way of consolidating and owning that relationship – which in music is vital,” he explains.Instead, he looked into creating a basic iPhone app that took the best bits of social media, such as the user experience, and applied it to owned media. It worked well, and Vaughan decided to try to build on this idea. Forget social networks – the future is community media, says the boss of Disciple Media whatsapp More From Our Partners Brave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.org980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.com Tags: Bespoke Donald Trump Facebook Google People Twitterlast_img read more

Businesses innovate but brands fall behind in race for environmentally conscious customers

first_imgSunday 24 February 2019 11:58 pm Businesses innovate but brands fall behind in race for environmentally conscious customers August Graham whatsapp whatsapp Read This NextIf You’re Losing Hair in This Specific Spot, It Might Be a Thyroid IssueVegamour20 Stars Who’ve Posted Nude Selfies, From Lizzo to John Legend (Photos)The WrapJim Cramer Calls for Billionaire Tax: ‘This Society Has to Start AddressingThe Wrap’The View’: Meghan McCain Calls VP Kamala Harris a ‘Moron’ for BorderThe Wrap’Drake & Josh’ Star Drake Bell Pleads Guilty to Attempted ChildThe WrapTop 5 Tips If You’re Losing Your EyebrowsVegamourWhat Causes Hair Loss? Every Trigger ExplainedVegamourBest Wine Gifts & Wine Accessories at Every PriceGayotSmoking and Hair Loss: Are They Connected?Vegamour Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeUndoMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailUndoNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyUndobonvoyaged.comTotal Jerks: These Stars Are Horrible People.bonvoyaged.comUndoDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily FunnyUndoLiver Health1 Bite of This Melts Belly And Arm Fat (Take Before Bed)Liver HealthUndoMisterStoryWoman files for divorce after seeing this photoMisterStoryUndoPost FunRare Photos Show Us Who Meghan Markle Really IsPost FunUndoMoney CougarLily From The AT&T Ads Is Causing A Stir For One ReasonMoney CougarUndocenter_img Some of the world’s biggest brands are not innovating despite customers who demand more action on climate issues, a pressure group has warned.Top companies such as Nestle, Coca Cola and Procter & Gamble are in a race to adapt to vegans and customers who are keen to reduce plastic packaging. Read more: On a roll: Vegan sausage roll sales help Greggs seek higher profitsYet around 60 per cent of the top revenue-generating products for many major companies have not found low-carbon innovations for a decade, the CDP found.“Given that most companies generate over 50 per cent of their revenues from these key brands, including Nescafe, Budweiser and Dove, they must up their game or risk falling foul of changing consumer demands,” the group said.Read more: Weekly Grill: Chef Ben Murphy on catering for butter-and-cream ‘vegans’Anglo-Dutch firm Unilever came top of the class for the household and personal care sector, the CDP said, after a push to develop vegan personal care ranges.The survey found that five of seven food and drinks companies which once offered dairy and meat based products are now innovating to find vegan alternatives, and over half of companies are trying to introduce biodegradable packaging. Share Tags: Trading Archive last_img read more