Robert Smith Sr. and Robert Smith Jr. Re-join ARI as Senior Advisors to the Board

first_imgANAHEIM, CA — American Remanufacturers, Inc. announced the return of Robert Smith, Sr. to lead all day-to-day activities and to serve as an advisor to the board. Robert Smith, Jr., will also be rejoining the organization. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Smith, Sr., who retired from ARI in April 2004, is the former chairman of ARI and co-founder of Car Components Technologies, Inc. (CCT), which merged with ARI in March 2003. Rob Smith, Jr., also a co-founder of CCT, will be bringing years of remanufacturing experience and strong vendor and customer relationships to the organization. “I look forward to returning to the automotive aftermarket and getting back to work at ARI. We have great ideas for the future and an outstanding team of dedicated people. Together, we will continue to develop creative solutions for our customers and vendor partners,” said Smith, Sr. Additionally, ARI announced that Brian Johnson has been named chief financial officer. Johnson was formerly CFO of Pliant Corporation, a leading producer of value-added film and flexible packaging products for personal care, medical, food, industrial and agricultural markets with annual sales in excess of $900 million. “Although new to the automotive aftermarket, Johnson is a versatile executive,” said Smith Sr. “In addition to his financial acumen, he has several years of operational leadership experience under his belt. This will be invaluable with respect to finalizing the integration of the ARI businesses and creating the foundation for the company’s growth strategy.” Advertisement Effective with these changes, ARI also stated that Larry Pavey left the company and his position on the board. Pavey joined ARI in May 2003 as chief executive officer and was subsequently named chairman. “I’ve known Larry for many years, as do many people in the industry. We wish him the best in his future endeavors,” said Smith, Sr. _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.last_img read more

Investment down by half in Thames Valley

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Filling stations

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Roll up for Mendoza’s magical mystery tour

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Jibbing and tacking with Captain Jack

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

Dockwise positions itself for offshore growth

first_imgThe company remains upbeat in its outlook but says that it has “still fully to shake off the delayed impact of the 2009 oil price slump.”Dockwise, with a fleet of 19 semi-submersible vessels and a USD240 million ultra-large heavy lift vessel on order, reported full year adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortisation of USD176 million – down on 2009 – while 2010 net profit of USD37 milllion fell from an adjusted USD63 million in 2009.Andre Goedee, Dockwise chief executive said: “2010 was a demanding year, but Dockwise demonstrated its resilience and we made strong progress. The group turned in a solid financial performance in challenging markets.”Mr Goedee claimed that that the decision to order the ‘Type Zero’ ultra-large heavylift vessel will give the company a “unique presence in a premium segment of the market”.Mr Goedee added: “With our principal client industry, oil and gas, in robust health, Dockwise is looking forward to 2011 and beyond. In the short term, we have still fully to shake off the delayed impact of the 2009 oil price slump, however longer term we are encouraged by a number of factors.”Sustained buoyancy in the oil price should stimulate the demand for drill rigs for field developments, while we await the recovery in port and marine services which historically has followed a macro-economic upturn. Beyond this year, major offshore project activity provides an encouraging horizon.”For the last three months of 2010, Dockwise reported a “healthy performance” with revenues of USD123 million, against an adjusted result of USD118.2 million for the same period of 2009.Dockwise said uit sees evidence of a “sustained upturn”, but as a “late-cycle business”, the benefits are likely to longer to feed through than to elsewhere in the oilfield services sector.”Looking beyond this year, and assessing generational rather cyclical change, we are encouraged. From 2012 onward, we see a growing set of major offshore new production and development projects for which we are aggressively positioning Dockwise to be the offshore service provider of choice.”last_img read more

No, the Great Barrier Reef is not actually dead

first_img Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. (CNN) There is a big difference between dead and dying.Outside Magazine published a somewhat tongue-in-cheek obituary for the Great Barrier Reef earlier this week, citing its lifespan from 25 million BC-2016. The article detailed the life of the reef, its active membership in the ecological community, its worldwide fame and the coral bleaching that has led to its deteriorating health. “The Great Barrier Reef of Australia passed away in 2016 after a long illness. It was 25 million years old,” read the article.The Great Barrier Reef of Australia passed away in 2016 after a long illness. It was 25 million years old: https://t.co/TrEXJuTxFJ #RIP pic.twitter.com/7U3wPDPSM2— Outside Magazine (@outsidemagazine) October 12, 2016Immediate response on social mediaThe obituary was met with horror and disbelief, both by scientists and social media users alike. Russell Brainard, chief of the Coral Reef Ecosystem Program at NOAA’s Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, told HuffPost that he believes the article was highlighting the urgency of the situation, but that those who don’t have any context “are going to take it at face value that the Great Barrier Reef is dead.”Many people on social media are indeed taking it at face value. Twitter users have been grieving the loss of the reef and urging followers to pay serious attention to the consequences. Many are spreading false information entirely. Rowan Jacobsen, the writer of the obituary, is a food and environmental writer, not a scientist. But the article has led some outlets to claim that scientists have declared the reef officially dead, further spreading the exaggeration.People have also taken to Twitter to try to get the truth out. Environmental reporter Tony Davis tweeted, “Reports of the Great Barrier Reef’s death are greatly exaggerated, say scientists, booing Outside Magazine” and the Cornell Cooperative Extension at Rockland County, which cites ecological sustainability as one of its missions, tweeted “Great Barrier Reef is Dying NOT Dead! ‘The message should be that it isn’t too late… not we should all give up.’”The Great Barrier Reef is the world’s largest coral reef ecosystem and a UNESCO World Heritage site. It covers more than 300,000 square kilometers and consists of more than 3,000 reefs, 600 islands, and 300 coral cays.Recovery effortsThere’s no denying that the Great Barrier Reef is in serious trouble. According to a report by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, 93% of the reef is affected by bleaching, putting the reef in danger of extinction. Bleaching occurs when coral are put under extreme stress by changes in conditions like temperature, light, or nutrients. In these conditions, they expel symbiotic algae from their tissues, causing them to turn white.Scientists are increasingly worried that over-exaggerating the state of the reef will promote the idea that it is past the point of recovery. Professor John Pandolfi from the ARC Centre at the University of Queensland has expressed hope. “It is critically important now to bolster the resilience of the reef, and to maximize its natural capacity to recover.” But the effects are serious and possibly permanent. “The reef is no longer as resilient as it once was, and it’s struggling to cope with three bleaching events in just 18 years,” he said.The obituary lays blame on the Australian government, noting that the government pressured the United Nations to remove the reef from a climate change report because it was concerned about its impact on tourism. But on September 28, the Australian and Queensland governments released the first Reef 2050 Plan annual report, showing the $2 billion investment toward improving the reef’s health for future generations is paying off. The plan has accomplished 29 of its 151 intended actions, though it notes that the recovery process needs to be accelerated if they want to continue to be successful.Coral bleaching, fishing, mining, and burning fossil fuels have all contributed to the destruction of the reef over several decades. More than 2 million people visit it each year, and governments, scientists, and charities are working so future generations can continue to appreciate its beauty.It’s not dead yet, folks. Published: October 14, 2016 3:19 PM EDT No, the Great Barrier Reef is not actually dead SHARElast_img read more

UNHCR: More than 1,000 immigrants rescued by Libyan Coast Guard this…

first_imgFILE PHOTO:31 August 2019, —: Around 100 migrants stand and lie tightly packed on deck of the rescue ship “Eleonore” in the early hours of the morning. The “Eleonore” took in the migrants on 26.08.2019 off the Libyan coast. The people were rescued while their boat was sinking, said Axel Steier, spokesman for the Dresden aid organisation Mission Lifeline, which supports the “Eleonore”. The ship continues to search for a safe haven. Photo: Johannes Filous/dpa (Photo by Johannes Filous/picture alliance via Getty Images) 123 migrants rescued off Libyan coast 27 August 2019, —: The rescue ship “Eleonore” sails on the Mediterranean with around 100 migrants on board. The “Eleonore” took in the migrants on 26.08.2019 off the Libyan coast. The people were rescued while their boat was sinking, said Axel Steier, spokesman for the Dresden aid organisation Mission Lifeline, which supports the “Eleonore”. Italy’s Interior Minister Salvini has banned the German rescue ship from mooring in the country’s ports. (Aerial photograph with drone) Photo: Johannes Filous/picture alliance via Getty Images)The United Nations Higher Commission of Refugees (UNHCR) on Friday said that more than 1,000 illegal immigrants have been rescued by the Libyan Coast Guard so far this year.As of Feb. 6, some 1,040 refugees and migrants have been registered as rescued or intercepted at sea by the Libyan Coast Guard and have disembarked in Libya, an increase of 121 percent compared to the same period in 2019, the UNHCR said.The UNHCR also said it requires more than 85 million U.S. dollars for its humanitarian operations to assist refugees, asylum-seekers and internally displaced people in Libya.Due to the state of insecurity and chaos following the 2011 uprising that toppled late leader Muammar Gaddafi’s regime, Libya became a preferred point of departure for many illegal immigrants wanting to cross the Mediterranean Sea toward European shores.Shelters in Libya are currently overcrowded with thousands of immigrants rescued at sea or arrested by the Libyan authorities, despite international calls to close them.Related 3,300 migrants rescued off Libyan coast Libyan coast guard rescues 61 off western coastlast_img read more

U.S. Senate Candidates Debate Days Before Election

first_imgFacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Alaska’s political races are started to get heated in the final few days of the campaign season, with U.S. Senate candidates last night criticizing one another’s party choices and fighting with their own at a public media debate. U.S. Senator Lisa Murkowski was at the center of the attacks, with two of her opponents describing Murkowski as part of an ineffective Congress, which is split along deeply-entrenched party lines. Independent Margaret Stock and Libertarian Joe Miller also denounced the Republican party’s decision not to hear and confirm President Barack Obama’s Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland. Metcalfe, formerly a Republican, has clashed with the Alaska Democratic Party, which has shown support for Stock.center_img Murkowski pointed out that her three most vocal rivals, Stock, Miller, and Democrat Ray Metcalfe, all used to belong to different parties. The incumbent told the crowd she hasn’t changed her party label just to win an election, and that she remains true to her core values.last_img read more

‘Cityzens’ arrest – Former champs spoil Liverpool EPL celebration party with 4-0 win

first_imgMANCHESTER, England (AP):As they stepped on to the pitch, Liverpool’s players were given a guard of honour from Manchester City. It was the only time they looked like English Premier League (EPL) champions yesterday.“I think they drank a lot of beers in the last week,” City manager Pep Guardiola said.The dethroned champions made sure there was an abrupt comedown from the partying. A merciless attacking display sparked by City scorers Kevin De Bruyne, Raheem Sterling, and Phil Foden consigned Liverpool to a 4-0 loss exactly a week after their 30-year title drought ended.“They were quicker than us in mind – we lacked fluidity,” Liverpool manager Jürgen Klopp said. “Isn’t it nice another team can be champions when Man City play so well?”The slack defending and lack of sharpness from Liverpool were perhaps forgiveable from players who had spent the previous 31 rounds establishing an unprecedented 23-point lead to become England’s earliest champions.Such an emphatic loss is not how Liverpool wanted to close out such a memorable season, especially when there are still enough games to overhaul City’s record 100-point haul from 2017-18.Klopp wasn’t as downbeat as the result suggested.“I saw a brilliant attitude. I saw boys who were fighting with all their effort,” he said. “We didn’t behave like somebody who became champions a week ago.” A Night to Forget It was a night to forget for so many Liverpool players – particularly Joe Gomez, who dragged Raheem Sterling down to concede a penalty converted by Kevin De Bruyne in the 25th minute.“We tried to play football, taking risks,” Guardiola said, “because they are the best team I ever faced in my life with high pressing. It is incredible how fast they are, how quick they play.”De Bruyne and Phil Foden helped City stylishly waltz through Liverpool and show how the title can be reclaimed next season.Receiving a pass from Foden, Sterling took the ball past Gomez with left boot before using his right to knock in City’s second in the 35th minute. Sterling and Gomez reunited in an EPL match for the first time since Liverpool’s victory over City at Anfield in November that was followed the next day by a training camp fight while they were on England duty. Yesterday’s EPL results Sheffield United 3-1 TottenhamMan City 4-0 Liverpoollast_img read more