Addressing the “Weakness” Question during a Job Interview

first_imgOne of the most common—and most difficult questions faced during a job interview is one that many candidates disdain and often consider pointless: “What is your greatest weakness?”We expect that the question will be coming, but often wonder why it is asked in the first place. After all, why would anyone in such an important and pivotal point in a job search candidly confess to their greatest flaws? From the interviewer’s perspective, what value is there is listening to candidates skate around the question during the job interview? If we know that it’s unlikely that a candidate will provide an answer that is completely direct and honest, why ask the question in the first place?The answer is actually very simple. It’s because the way that individuals answer this question during the job interview is very telling. The answer provides insight into an individual’s character. It speaks to their self-awareness and ability to be self-reflective. It is an indicator of the willingness for self-improvement. It demonstrates a level of self-confidence, personal drive, and professional maturity. Every answer reaches well beyond the perceived identification of an area of opportunity.- Sponsor – When conducting the job interview, the ability to gauge character is a critical skill, and tells us a great deal about the quality of the candidate. While the question may be expected, the answers provided can still communicate a great deal of valuable information. Bottom line, the interviewer wants to know what type of person you are to work with, what type of employee you will be to manage, and how you will fit into the working environment.Common MistakesWhile most candidates may anticipate the “weakness” question during the job interview, many still struggle to provide a strong answer. In fact, many will try to outsmart the interviewer with their response, and end up outsmarting themselves. A few common mistakes that candidates can make would include:Trying to spin a desirable quality into a “weakness” response. Many will attempt to take an aspect of performance that they know is typically seen in a positive light and try to spin it as a “weakness.” Some common examples would include:“I’m too much of a perfectionist.”“I care too much about doing a good job.”“Sometimes I work too hard.”Most interviewers quickly see right through this type of response, and see the answer as a way to avoid the question and the heart of the matter at hand. Remember, most good interviewers will not only recognize this avoidance, but will ask follow-up questions that can lead to some uncomfortable outcomes. For example: “What do you mean that you work too hard? Is it too difficult? Do you think you should work less?”Revealing a weakness that raises flags. It can be very difficult to talk about flaws in a situation like a job interview, especially in situations where the candidate is nervous, stressed, or unprepared. Some candidates may end up confessing to a weakness such as:“Sometimes I don’t get along with some of my peers at work.”“Sometimes I have a difficult time getting to work on time.”“Sometimes I have a hard time completing my work assignments.”It can be very difficult to overcome this type of response, as such comments are directly related to performance, and are quite frankly strong reasons not to hire a particular candidate.Failing to provide a real answer. Some candidates will claim that they can’t think of a weakness. Really? You can’t come up with a single area where you can improve? This type of answer typically is seen as an indicator that the candidate isn’t prepared, isn’t being honest, and/or lacks the professional maturity to objectively reflect on their skills, abilities, and career in general.How to Answer the “Weakness” QuestionSo how should you answer the “weakness” question? Let’s start by understanding the reasons why the question is being asked in the first place. Your response isn’t simply based upon the particular weakness—it’s also about your ability to be self-reflective. Can you look at yourself in the mirror and say, “Where can I get better?”As a starting point, understand that if someone is asking you where you can get better, you should expect that there will be a follow-up question: “What are you doing to improve?” Think through this question beforehand as well, and answer that question as part of your response. Demonstrate the desire for professional growth. Immediately show that you recognize the need to improve and are taking steps to get there.Don’t get caught up on the word “weakness.” Search for your personal areas of opportunity and where you would like to improve. This is the question that is at hand, and likely what the interviewer is looking for. Focus on the question and not just a particular word or phrase that you interpret as a negative.Be prepared. Looking at your areas of opportunity is an important aspect of every individual’s professional growth plan. It’s not good enough to play a part—you have to actually be self-reflective in order to reach your professional goals.Be genuine. Don’t simply choose an area of opportunity because it sounds good. While it’s important to be smart about your decision and pick an acceptable subject, look at an area where you sincerely feel that you can get better. This honesty and integrity will make a difference, and will be reflected in the way the information is delivered—and received.Take the initiative to improve. A willingness and motivation to improve will lead to successful outcomes, regardless of the circumstances surrounding a job interview.Every job interview is an opportunity. However, it’s important to remember that we also create our own opportunities, and it’s critical that we take the steps to be prepared. Self-reflection is a critical aspect of professional growth, and is a common characteristic that every company will look for in their leadership. Make the effort, take the steps, and good things will happen.  Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

Moorestown: Much more than an iPhone killer

first_imgFirst let me say I’m not on the inside track with Moorestown. I’m an outside observer with my own perspective on this product, but I have to say… I think this will be HUGE. Lot’s of talk about the Moorestown platform at IDF this year and I’ve heard many refer to this as the iPhone killer, or next generation iPhone. The game changer is size, the processing power, and WiMax capabilities. This is much more than anything in the market now. It can be almost anything you want it to be, and what you want it to do might be more about what devices it talks to. Here’s my personal speculation on potential uses for Moorestown.Harmony Remote Killer: This one is easy. Unlike the iphone with this kind of device you should be able to add and download applications and be configure to do pretty much what you want it to do. It’s the size of a remote. It has bluetooth and WiMax. It should be able to talk to all of your AV stuff and replace your most advanced universal remotes.GameBoy/PSP Killer: This be will run on Intel’s next generation 45nm chips. It should far exceed anything any hand held game system can do today. You could host games on the fly with people near you or host over the Internet. I actually believe this could be an XBox Killer. It will have the horsepower, it will be ultimately connected. It just needs peripherals like a dock or wireless connectivity to a large display and keyboard. Drop it on your coffee table, turn on your wall mounted LCD, pick up a wireless controller and you are gaming.Desktop Killer: Yes, a desktop killer. Again it should have the horsepower. It will have highspeed connections and a full blown browser. More and more apps are moving to the web. There’s a lot of talk about the death of the application, as applications can be run in the browser. Drop it on your desk, have it detect and synch with your wireless keyboard, mouse and monitor and you are working. Also more IT shops are starting to see the value of OS and application streaming technology where you can pull down the apps you need when you need them. Edit a spreadsheet, crop a photo, do a CAD Design, all apps come from the network when you need them, wherever you are.Storage may only an issue for the few things you need locally. With WiMax, songs, videos, applications could all be available at your finger tips whether you have them stored on your PC, DVR, or from a service provider. You could ultimately have any data or any application on a powerful mobile device on your hip, in your pocket or in your purse. My perspective is Moorestown is shaping up to be the ubiquitous everything device. I discussed this idea 2 years ago with an Intel engineer, during a school fundraiser. I claimed if Intel could create the device the size of cell phone with the processing power of a PC, you would not need any other device other than peripherals. I was new, I was in marketing and he thought I was nuts. And he pretty much told me so, citing that he didn’t see how Intel would profit from it. A couple of weeks later I saw him again and he was anxious to tell me he just saw a presentation that discussed exactly what I was talking about. I’d like to think this is Moorestown… and personally I can’t wait!!last_img read more

What to do post-run to maximize your results

first_imgNo more menthol cigarettes: New ban on tobacco, vape flavors View comments Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ RELATED STORY:Tabal delivers first gold medal for PH, rules women’s marathonSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next As well as staying hydrated during a run in order to prevent injuries, cramping, and early fatigue, it is also important to rehydrate after you have finished, as well as maintaining your fluid intake throughout the rest of the day. If you are training for a marathon this is even more important; marathon runners can lose up to 5 percent of their total body weight during the race, or around four to five liters of fluids on average.To avoid dehydration and help the body replenish its reserves, be sure to drink plenty of fluids in the hours after your run, whether you prefer water, fruit juice or sports recovery drinks. You should also avoid alcohol if you really want to reach peak performance. Not only will it dehydrate you, but celebrity trainer David Kirsch also adds that “during a wellness program there is no room for hangovers. You need to be fresh, focused, and on top of your game to achieve the desired results.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingGet a good night’s sleepDr. Andrew Murray, who works predominantly with runners but also swimmers and cyclists, says that the one thing they all have in common is they are “world class sleepers.” He recommends at least seven hours a night to reduce the risk of infection and stay healthy, plus a good night’s sleep is possibly the best way for your body to repair itself after exercise. Kirsch also adds that skimping on sleep “will sabotage your hard-earned workout gains,” so to get the most out of your run, as well as reach your true running potential in your next one, make sure you prioritize sleep. MOST READ Trump to designate Mexican drug cartels as terrorist groups Image: Geber86/Istock.com via AFP RelaxnewsWith the Chicago Marathon taking place this Sunday, Oct. 8, many may be feeling inspired by the World Marathon Major to start their own running regime. Whether you’re a beginner or a marathon expert, here we round up some of the key things to do post-run to look after your body and maximize your performance.Drink upADVERTISEMENT Argentine bishop appears at court hearing on abuse charges Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claimcenter_img Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Winter storm threatens to scramble Thanksgiving travel plans ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims Refuel your musclesDalton Wong, trainer to Hollywood star Jennifer Lawrence and founder of TwentyTwo Training advises a post-run combination of protein to repair, fat to help you feel full, and carbs to fuel the body. He recommends a protein smoothie or a proper meal between one hour to 90 minutes after your run, and nuts, seeds, and/or an apple as good options for snack until you can eat a real meal. Dr. Murray agrees, also recommending a ratio of three portions of carbs to one portion of protein within the hour after your run. Pasta or a baked potato with tuna, a chicken sandwich, eggs or pulses are all good choices.Stretch it outAlthough Dr. Murray says you don’t need to do a specific warm-up, just something to get you moving a little and ready for running, he does recommend a cool down, especially when you have done a more intense, longer run. Cooling down and stretching is a key step in any running plan to aid recovery, reduce muscle soreness and prevent injuries.Foam rolling can also be useful, not only straight after your run but also the day after and days following if you’re still feeling sore. It can also be particularly helpful when combined with stretching because it helps break up adhesions, which allows for a better and deeper stretch. JBADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES TNT import Rice ejected early in Game 4last_img read more