Giving is like a drug Hamilton couple pledge bulk of their estate

first_img The couple didn’t have children. Making money came first. Their lucky strike would be Flamboro Downs, the harness racing track they owned for almost 30 years and that Magna Entertainment purchased from them for $70 million in 2003.“When you get this pile of money dumped on you, it was a no-brainer for us — charity came into it immediately,” Charlie says. “Nobody communicated with Margaret and I asking for money – nobody.“We invited them to a party at Flamboro Downs and started handing out cheques, and that time we covered McMaster University, Hamilton Health Sciences, St. Joseph’s – the same organizations we are dealing with now.”Charlie has maintained his work ethic, and is a tireless investor/money manager, using a save-buy-and-hold strategy to build a portfolio heavy on bank stocks with the odd energy play mixed in.“I work my ass off on the market making more money so I can give it away,” he says, chuckling. “It’s like smoking to me.”Speaking of which: Charlie is toying with the idea of investing in marijuana, and touts Aurora Cannabis Inc., as a potentially good buy. As for the actual product, well, he has consumed weed in edible form once, but after doing so felt as though his brain had been transformed into a “block of butter.”“I said to Margaret, ‘Jesus, I don’t need this. I don’t want any part of it.’”He is more bullish on cannaboids or CBDs, however, which don’t have a psychoactive effect on the user. Charlie has been taking CBD capsules to help him deal with a nerve issue in his leg, a problem that was giving him cramps and playing havoc with his sleep.“I sleep now, and it’s beautiful,” he says.When you get this pile of money dumped on you, it was a no-brainer for us — charity came into it immediatelyCharlie Juravinski Featured Stories Share this story’Giving is like a drug’: Hamilton couple pledge bulk of their estate to create $100-million health research endowment Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn More Comment 7 Comments Sponsored By: advertisement Joe O’Connor Charlie and Margaret Juravinski: “Giving is like a drug. Nothing feels better than helping others.”Courtesy McMaster University Reddit May 29, 20198:14 AM EDT Filed under News FP Street Charlie stretches out the syllables when he uses the word “philanthropist,” because, well, the word doesn’t fit the way he views himself, even if it is a match for his and Margaret’s actions. They are both Depression-era kids who grew up thousands of kilometres apart but knowing one thing in common: poverty. Charlie’s family was from Saskatchewan. His first pair of “skates” was two steel runners with a board on top. He shared a bed with his two brothers. He had one pair of shoes and one pair of britches and zero memory of his father ever actually having a job, since there were no jobs, really, for most folks in Prince Albert in the 1930s.Margaret lived a similar experience in East Hamilton.“I’ve been poor and I’ve been rich – and there is no comparison,” she says. “Poverty is terrible.”The couple met in Hamilton after the war. Margaret was a knockout working at the Woolworth’s counter making sandwiches. Charlie, in his own words, was a “dead-ender,” a dropout but a good dancer, with a car and a friend who introduced him to his future wife as “Charlie Jug-O-Liquour.”I’ve been poor and I’ve been rich – and there is no comparison. Poverty is terrible.Margaret Juravinski What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation ‘Giving is like a drug’: Hamilton couple pledge bulk of their estate to create $100-million health research endowment With Charles and Margaret Juravinski, ‘it has been a lifetime of generosity’ Email Recommended For YouICE Futures Canada quotes and cash pricesDollar modestly higher in thin summer trading; upside limitedGoldman banker highlights Morgan Stanley’s Hong Kong IPO woesAll change again in zinc and lead’s relative value dance: Andy HomeLoonie steadies near 9-month high as home sales dip Charlie and Margaret have weathered some storms over their six-plus decades together; both have had some health scares. Charlie suggests that the secret to their longevity as a couple is never going to bed angry. Margaret waves her hand dismissively upon hearing this particular wisdom, challenging its accuracy, before explaining how Charlie always goes to bed angry after they fight — and that her secret is to walk away from it, literally out of the bedroom and into another bedroom at the opposite end of their Texas ranch-style house.Come morning, though, they will be back together again at the kitchen table, with Charlie smoking, and with plans afoot to work on the things they do agree upon, like giving away a fortune to a community that has given them so much in return.“Every place we go now, and it doesn’t matter where we go – somebody will stick out their hand and say “thank you,” Charlie says. “How can you get a better feeling than that?”• Email: joconnor@nationalpost.com | Twitter: GREENSVILLE, Ont. — Charlie Juravinski is, in the words of his physician, an “enigma,” an outlier at 89 years of age, who has no business (statistically speaking) being alive, but is alive just the same, and so the best medical advice doctors can offer to him is to keep doing exactly as he has been doing.For Charlie, that means lighting a cigarette with his purple lighter, and another after that, while he and his wife of almost 63 years, Margaret, sit at their kitchen table on the outskirts of Hamilton discussing another of Charlie’s habits, one which Margaret, who doesn’t smoke, shares in enthusiastically — giving away piles of money.Sixteen million dollars here, another few million there, a run of philanthropy that has totalled about $50-million over the past 18 years, and is identifiable around Hamilton by the names attached to several buildings, including the Juravinski Hospital and Cancer Centre at Hamilton Health Sciences, the Margaret & Charles Juravinski Education, Research and Development Centre at McMaster University.“Giving is like a drug,” Charlie says. “Nothing feels better than helping others.” MacKenzie Bezos takes Warren Buffett’s pledge to give away more than half of her $37 billion windfall from divorce Payback for paying it forward: For companies, it’s not charity anymore, it’s community giving Where AI meets humanity: Gerald Schwartz, Heather Reisman announce $100M donation toward U of T innovation centre So now Charlie and Margaret are giving again, earmarking the bulk of their estate to create a $100-million endowment to fund the Juravinski Research Centre, in partnership with Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University and St. Joseph’s Healthcare. By Charlie’s math, the endowment will pay out about $5 million a year to its partners, in a gift that will give in perpetuity.“With Charles and Margaret, it has been a lifetime of generosity,” says Rob MacIsaac, president and chief executive of Hamilton Health Sciences. “They have been very effective at making a difference in Hamilton.” ← Previous Next → Facebook Twitter Join the conversation →last_img read more

They fumble with things How to spot a stoned customer in Ontario

first_img On top of the guidelines for responsible sales, the CannSell training also focuses on cannabis history in Canada, federal and provincial legislation, compliance obligations and the risks and harms of cannabis.The online training — with interactive segments and videos — is expected to take four hours on average. The point, the government said earlier this month, is to make sure “those who are selling (cannabis) understand its various forms, effects and consequences of use.” Once the training is finished, there is an exam. A sample exam, provided to reporters during a preview on Wednesday, includes questions on Ontario and Canadian law, as well as more esoteric questions such as, “Which terpene smells similar to lavender?” (The answer is linalool.)View this document on ScribdTrainees must achieve 80 per cent on the exam to get their certification. If they fail twice, they have to pay another $49.99 to retake the course.Lift CEO Matei Olaru said that was similar to Ontario’s bartending certification, Smart Serve, which also requires a retake if a student fails twice.“It should be strict,” he said. “You’re selling a product that can affect someone’s consciousness and state of being. You better know what you’re doing.” Reddit Jake Edmiston Comment The new grey market: As older users warm up to cannabis, pot companies want to learn more The point of the training is to make sure “those who are selling (cannabis) understand its various forms, effects and consequences of use.” Once the training is finished, there is also an exam.AP Photo/Brennan Linsley Supply issues blamed as N.L. loses first private, regulated cannabis store Screen shot Share this story‘They fumble with things’: How to spot a stoned customer in Ontario Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn More This is not about use of cannabis…. We’re looking for gross signs of intoxication, where it’s really obvious … something’s not right about that individual.Andrew Murie, CEO, MADD Canada ‘They fumble with things’: How to spot a stoned customer in Ontario Cannabis retailers have to undergo mandatory training — and yes, there will be a quiz “As they’re putting their card in, and they have to put their pin number in, they’ll fumble with that,” Murie added. “Speech is a real big thing — it goes high, it goes low…. There’s a delayed reaction when you ask them a question. They’re kind of looking off to the side.” How Big Cannabis is pursuing a back door into Ontario’s retail pot regime CBD is not addictive and does not get you high — yet in Canada it’s treated like a psychoactive drug Ontario’s rules restricting pot producers’ store ownership could throw retail partnerships into disarray The new certification program, called CannSell, is the only training program approved by Ontario’s Alcohol and Gaming Commission board of directors. The agreement does not include “any monetary transaction” between the government, MADD and Lift & Co., according to Lift.All employees at Ontario’s first tranche of 25 private retail stores are required to complete the training — which costs $49.99 — before their first day of work. The training will be available starting Monday.Asked if the tips on identifying intoxicated customers might inadvertently see sober people turned away simply for being clumsy, Murie insisted that clerks are only advised to refuse service after noticing a combination of signs, not just one.“One of the fundamental questions right off the bat was: If you smell cannabis on somebody, is that enough to say you’re not going to serve them? We had to go, ‘No that’s not enough,’” he said. “This is not about use of cannabis; it’s whether they’re intoxicated…. We’re looking for gross signs of intoxication — where it’s really obvious … something’s not right about that individual.”Screen shot from the training course. Facebook Related Stories Twitter February 21, 20192:41 PM EST Filed under News Retail & Marketing Government-mandated training for Ontario cannabis retailers will include a set of guidelines to assist clerks in the delicate task of spotting intoxicated customers and refusing to serve them.The program, to be completed by every person working in Ontario’s private cannabis retail sector when it launches in April, provides a list of tell-tale signs, including “dry mouth,” “inappropriate sweating” and “inappropriate speech volume.”“(Intoxicated people) fumble with things,” said Andrew Murie, chief executive at Mothers Against Drunk Driving Canada, which designed the training in partnership with the cannabis technology company Lift & Co.Screen shot from the training course. Tilray signs creative $250-million revenue-sharing deal with U.S. brand powerhouse ABG Screen Shot Email 10 Comments Join the conversation →last_img read more

Watch Tesla Autopilot Mad Max Mode Get Tested

See Tesla’s New Navigate On Autopilot Feature In Action Tesla Camera As Built-In Dashcam Part Of V9 Update Tesla Autopilot seems to respect side traffic pretty well, although because it’s beta, there are still some quirks. At least once the car wanted to change over to a lane that didn’t exist. There are also some mapping problems sometimes, where the car slows down, perhaps thinking there will be highway exit or something.In other words, it’s exceptional when the car does the job properly and overtakes on its own, but basically, you need to pay even more attention than in standard Autopilot without unannounced automatic lane changes combined with navigation.We believe that at this stage, Tesla is simply acquiring data needed for further development of a more autonomous, reliable system.Some more footage of Mad Max Navigate on Autopilot….embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }User Experience Design feedback when turning on Navigate on AutopilotFeedback with Navigate on Autopilot on the display behind the steering wheel. Oh, and I heared an even newer version will be released fleet wide on monday! What a great start of the month! .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }Last Mad Max Navigate on Autopilot movie for today!A huge leap forward into our amazing future, being Tesla owners .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }Ano one more video – Tesla Autopilot v 9 Drive by navigation – from Dennis D:.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } Tesla Autopilot in…Mad Max mode.Tesla’s over-the-air software update to v9 (currently not yet widely available) brings the Navigate on Autopilot feature, with a capability to automatically change lanes on the highway (if the vehicle in front drives slower than the speed setting and there is another open lane on the road). Moreover, the car is guided by navigation, so it can enter and exit the highway automatically.Speed based lane changes have three options: disabled, mild, average and mad max. Change of the lane can be done with or without confirmation (yes/no).In several of the latest video featuring Navigate on Autopilot, Jasper Nuyens demonstrates the functionality in Europe. According to the videos, the new upgrade is a fantastic experience – kind of like magic.See Also Tesla Calls On Employees To Test Full Self-Driving Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 1, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

Electrify America announces second 200million EV infrastructure investment plan for California

Source: Electric Vehicles Magazine Electrify America has a $2-billion pot of money from naughty Volkswagen to invest in EV infrastructure, education and access programs. $800 of that is to be spent in California. In order to future-proof the program, EA is wisely dividing its investment into four phases. Now the company has announced its second $200-million round of investment in California. The Cycle 2 California ZEV Investment Plan will be implemented over 30 months, beginning in July 2019.“In developing our plan, we conducted a robust outreach process to solicit input and met with leaders in California communities, government and business to inform our decisions,” said Electrify America CEO Giovanni Palazzo. “We want to demystify what it means to own and drive electric vehicles by making chargers more visible, more convenient, and more a part of the everyday lives of Californians.”“We’ve also planned to further support ZEV adoption through services that are used by Californians every day – buses, shuttles, ride hail services – by providing more access to charging for those vehicles,” said COO Brendan Jones.Highlights of the Cycle 2 plan include:Metropolitan Areas: The focus of infrastructure investment in Cycle 2 will shift to more DC Fast Charging (DCFC) stations within metro areas. EA will invest in 9 California metro areas which are expected to account for 89 percent EVs in operation through 2022. The DCFCs will be placed in retail locations, but also consider the needs of adjacent multi-unit dwellings. EA will also invest in DCFC stations targeting car share, taxis and transportation networking company drivers.Highways & Regional Routes: The Cycle 2 investments will continue to build out a highway network of DCFC stations featuring charging power up to 350 kW, which can refuel a vehicle at up to 20 miles of range per minute.Residential: EA will develop an online tool that connects EV buyers with the various residential charging incentives and rebates available in California and simplifies the application process. This program will be designed to integrate with CARB’s recently announced ‘one-stop shop,’ which focuses on incentives for the ZEV purchase itself. EA will also offer no-money-down residential chargers and installation, and will develop a platform to allow drivers with a home charger to earn financial rewards for plugging in and supporting a demand response platform to promote grid stability.Bus and Shuttle Charging: EA will collaborate with transit operators to provide charging infrastructure. This approach offers a means of serving low-income populations who rely on public transportation.Rural: EA will deploy Level 2 chargers in rural areas with a focus on health care facilities and educational institutions in the Central, Coachella and Imperial Valleys.Renewable Generation: Electrify America will invest in renewable generation for select stations.Education and Awareness: EA will invest in additional education programs to boost awareness of the benefits of ZEVs, using TV, radio and online campaigns. Source: Electrify America read more

Tesla releases Model 3 software update with new climate controls antitheft feature

first_imgTesla is pushing a new software update to the Model 3 this week that includes new climate controls, a new anti-theft feature, and more. more…The post Tesla releases Model 3 software update with new climate controls, anti-theft feature, and more appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

What If An Electric Car Could Use Its Body As A Structural

first_imgCOULD AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE’S BODY ALSO BE ITS BATTERY?The question of where to put the heavy, bulky battery is central to electric vehicle design. Tesla pioneered the “skateboard” approach – mounting the battery at the bottom – and other EV-makers including BMW and Audi have followed the trend.Check Out These Stories: Above: Carbon Fiber (Image: Interesting Engineering via Texdata.com/Wikimedia Commons)The team has discovered that carbon fiber’s electrical and mechanical properties can be controlled by carefully rearranging its graphitic order and crystallite sites. Fibers with small, disorganized crystals have better electrical characteristics, and are slightly stiffer than steel. Large, highly-oriented crystals provide even better stiffness (over twice that of steel), but the electrochemical properties are not adequate for practical use as a battery. The team is now experimenting with ways to increase the composite thickness in order to overcome the mechanical challenges while boosting total energy storage capacity..embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }Above: Chalmers Professor Leif Asp describes his research findings (Youtube: Auto & Moto via Chalmers University of Technology)“The key is to optimize vehicles at system level – based on the weight, strength, stiffness and electrochemical properties,” says Chalmers Professor Leif Asp. “That is something of a new way of thinking for the automotive sector, which is more used to optimizing individual components. Structural batteries may perhaps not become as efficient as traditional batteries, but since they have a structural load-bearing capability, very large gains can be made at system level. In addition, the lower energy density of structural batteries would make them safer than standard batteries, especially as they would also not contain any volatile substances.”===Written by: Charles Morris; Sources: Chalmers University of Technology via Charged, Green Car Congress*Editor’s Note: EVANNEX, which also sells aftermarket gear for Teslas, has kindly allowed us to share some of its content with our readers, free of charge. Our thanks go out to EVANNEX. Check out the site here. Above: A different outlook for implementation of an electric vehicle battery (Image: Charged via Chalmers University of Technology)But what if the body panels of a vehicle could form part of its battery? Researchers at Sweden’s Chalmers University of Technology have been exploring the possibility of using carbon fiber as a structural battery. The team has studied the relationship between carbon fiber’s microstructure and electrochemical capacity, and is working to develop a combination that is both mechanically sound and energy-dense. Source: Electric Vehicle News Did U Of M Come Up With Solid-State Battery Breakthrough? Caterpillar Invests In Fisker’s Solid-State Battery Tech It Seems Tesla Has Some Undisclosed Battery Breakthroughs *This article comes to us courtesy of EVANNEX (which also makes aftermarket Tesla accessories). Authored by Charles Morris. The opinions expressed in these articles are not necessarily our own at InsideEVs. Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 17, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Check Out This Stealthy Black Tesla Model S Camera Car

first_img MKBHD Releases Tesla Factory Tour With Musk MKBHD Drifts, Drives, Launches Tesla Model 3 Performance: Watch Here Or, in other words, in its stealthy black wrap, this Tesla Model S makes for the perfect camera car when low noise and a sneak approach is essential.Even better though is the fact that it gets the endorsement of famed YouTuber MKBHD, a Tesla Model 3 owner and lover of tech. We too would take this Model S camera car and put it to use filming more affordable EVs like the Kia Niro EV we just drove out in California. Now that would be quite a scene.A matte black, silent, super smooth camera car. You have no idea how much I want this source: https://t.co/RiEdEecyvy pic.twitter.com/u5xPkU7jt3— Marques Brownlee (@MKBHD) January 28, 2019 Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 1, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Musk Talks Tesla & Automaker’s $25,000 Future Car With MKBHD Source: Electric Vehicle News Camera cars are kinda crazy. There’s no denying that fact.This particular one stands out for more reasons than one.For starters, it’s a Tesla. A Model S, to be precise. But beyond that cool element is its stealthy all-black wrap. Combine the stealth appearance with the quietness of electric drive and this makes for the ultimate stealth camera car.More From MKBHDlast_img read more

Tesla Model 3 Review After 26000 Miles Best Car Or Big Mistake

first_imgSince most people don’t rack up a whopping 26,000 miles in one year, Andy’s review is unique. If a car is going to have a bunch of initial issues, one would think many would surface after driving that many miles over a relatively short period of time.We realize that some of you don’t have the time or ability to watch videos, or are just not interested in them at all. Fortunately, while Andy covers a ton of information, he keeps his extensive video reasonably short. Additionally, he provides most of his information and observations in text form, which we’ve included in its entirety below.Do you own a Model 3? How many miles have you driven? How does your experience compare with Andy’s? Please let us know in the comment section below.Video Description via Andy Slye on YouTube:Tesla Model 3 Review: The TRUTH After 26,000 MilesTesla Model 3 Review after 1 year & 26,000 miles! Still the best car or was it a mistake?Almost a year ago I took delivery of my Tesla Model 3 and since then I’ve driven it over 26,000 miles. Is it still the best car I’ve ever driven or was it a $50,000 mistake? Let’s find out.In my original Tesla Model 3 review I mainly went over the features of the car but in this video I’m going to go over my experience of owning a #TeslaModel3 and focus on the 3 most important factors:Reliability:When I first got my Model 3 I was skeptical on how reliable it would be since it was a first generation of its kind, and there were a few horror stories online from early adopters who were experiencing software & hardware issues.I can honestly say my Model 3 has been 100% reliable for me so far, and yes even though that should be expected for a brand new car, it’s still a nice surprise how reliable it has been since Tesla is still relatively so young & since Model 3 is a very unique car. Range anxiety does exist, but the Model 3’s energy graph is extremely accurate in predicting the estimated range left when driving so as long as you pay attention to that and plan ahead you’ll be fine and shouldn’t ever have to worry about running out of battery.For how heavily it’s integrated with software I’m actually surprised my Model 3 has worked this well, and I’ve been extremely satisfied with it over my first 26,000 miles.Cost:Out of all those things during the first 25,000 miles in a Model 3 you only need to do tire rotations and I know this isn’t the norm but luckily for me there’s a local tire shop that gives free tire rotations to Tesla owners, just one of the many perks of going all-electric I guess.The only thing that has cost me money to drive my Model 3 this far is electricity from either at home or a Tesla Supercharger. My city is one of the best locations to put the Model 3 range efficiency to the test and with an average of 248 Wh/mile through all the seasons means the LR Model 3 is one of, if not the most efficient electric car out right now.It took 6,457 kWh to drive just over 26,000 miles, and since the Model 3 gets about 80% efficiency it actually took about 8,071 kWh and at my current electricity rate of 6.8 cents per kWh that comes to $549 that I’ve spent on electricity to drive my Model 3 over 26,000 miles. I’ve also charged for free at hotels, parking garages, and family members houses so my total cost to drive over 26,000 miles in my Model 3 is less than $600. My monthly electricity costs have only increased by an average of $36. To put it in perspective, a car that gets 30 mpg at $2.75/gallon would cost $2,383 to drive 26,000 miles and if you add a $50 oil change every 4,000 miles that would be an additional $325. This shows how much a person can save in fuel & oil by going all-electric, especially a Model 3.Enjoyment:It’s no surprise that the Tesla Model 3 is a joy to drive but I’ll quickly go over a few things that I don’t like because nothing is perfect. The windshield and windows fog up more than any other car I’ve ever driven. Fortunately I got some fog reducer that helps. I wish the frunk had a better closing mechanism or was able to close automatically because I hate leaving hand prints on the hood from closing it. I also wish the driver profiles would save the lumbar setting. Luckily that can be fixed with a software update which is one of my favorite things about the Model 3.Now moving along to the other things that I enjoy most about my Model 3: How a car can be this simple & minimalist yet pack so much power and torque is something I’ll always be impressed with.Yes there are times when it phantom brakes but if you’re using it as it’s designed you will always have a hand on the wheel ready to take over and I love knowing each time I use it, it’s getting better through the neural network.It charges overnight while I sleep, it stops charging when it reaches whatever limit I have set, and I wake up to an 80% charge every day or 100% charge if I’m about to take a road trip – no more stopping at gas stations. I can tell it to drive somewhere and it gives me real-time step-by-step directions on the beautiful responsive 15” touch screen which is the best screen in any vehicle out right now in my opinion.Now after a free software update and even after any battery degradation from driving 26,000 miles, my Model 3 now gets 320 rated miles on a full charge. Tesla Model 3 Review: After 6 Months And 10,000 Miles: Source: Electric Vehicle News Check Out This Brand-New In-Depth Tesla Model 3 Review What’s the real truth when it comes to looking back on that Tesla Model 3 purchase?YouTuber Andy Slye took the plunge about a year ago and purchased a Tesla Model 3 for some $50,000. Tesla has made a whole lot of changes since then. Reportedly, quality is now much better than it was early on. The Long Range Model 3 can now be had for $44,500 prior to rebates, and a $35,000 Model 3 is available as well.In addition, Tesla has pushed a plethora of over-the-air software updates. This means that (unlike cars from other automakers) Andy’s one-year-old Model 3 is just as up-to-date as those that people are purchasing today.Additional Tesla Model 3 Reviews: Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 1, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Tesla Model 3 Review: It’s A Love This, Hate That Kind Of Car: Videolast_img read more

Alex On Autos Has No More Soul Final Thoughts On LongTerm Soul

first_imgOut with the Soul EV, in with a Hyundai Nexo …Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img

FA to throw book at Mascherano

first_imgShare on Messenger Shares00 Topics This article is more than 11 years old FA to throw book at Mascherano Share via Email Sun 23 Mar 2008 22.35 EDT Andy Hunter at Old Trafford Share on Facebook Share on Twitter · Midfielder refuses to go until Benítez intervenes· United move five points clear after stylish victory Share on Twitter news Share via Email This article is more than 11 years old Share on Pinterest Javier Mascherano argues with referee Steve Bennett after being shown a second yellow card for dissent. Photograph: Richard Heathcote/Getty Images Share on Facebook Share on WhatsApp Soccer Share on LinkedIn Soccer Reuse this content Liverpool’s Javier Mascherano is likely to face a Football Association charge and an increased suspension for his furious reaction to being sent off at Manchester United yesterday. The midfielder was dismissed in the 43rd minute as United won 3-0 and increased their lead in the Premier League to five points.United’s dominant performance was overshadowed by an injury to Wayne Rooney which may result in his absence from England’s friendly against France on Wednesday and by the extraordinary loss of self-control by Mascherano.Already booked for a 10th-minute lunge on Paul Scholes, the 23-year-old Argentinian raced 20 yards to question Steve Bennett’s decision to book Fernando Torres for dissent and received an identical punishment from the referee. The red card for two bookable offences means he is suspended for Sunday’s derby with Everton but his reaction, refusing to leave the pitch and haranguing Bennett before being ushered down the tunnel by Peter Crouch and a physio, invited further punishment.Only last week the FA appealed for greater respect for referees after Ashley Cole’s insolence to Mike Riley when being booked at Tottenham Hotspur and it can charge Mascherano with improper conduct despite his dismissal. A guilty verdict would attract an extended suspension and possible fine for a player who had been integral to Liverpool’s recent revival.”He knows he made a mistake,” said Rafael Benítez. “But to have that decision in a big game like this is difficult to understand. I spoke to him in Spanish. He kept telling me, ‘I didn’t say anything,’ but I had to tell him it was over, finished. Mascherano is a fantastic professional and has been playing at the maximum level for years. He did not understand why he had been sent off. I just toldhim, ‘It’s finished.'”The Liverpool manager had to placate Mascherano after team-mates and coaches failed to curb the midfielder’s rising anger at Bennett, who had been the fourth official at White Hart Lane last Wednesday. “It was a mistake to try to ask the referee having already been booked. He doesn’t know the referees,” added Benítez. “The player told me that he was asking what happened, and Ryan Babel told me the same, and to get sent off for that made him really, really surprised. He could not understand why. The player knows he made a mistake but in this kind of big game it is wrong to leave a team with just 10 players because one of them asked why.”Asked whether he feared the FA would make an example of Mascherano, Benítez said: “The player was only asking. I don’t think to ask is a big problem.”Sir Alex Ferguson took a different view, saying the referee had no option but to dismiss the midfielder. “Dissent is dissent. I don’t know why Mascherano came from central midfield to argue with the referee. With all the things that have happened this week with Ashley Cole, there has been a lot of attention on dissent and this was dissent.”United had been the superior side before Mascherano’s expulsion and dominated thereafter, their profligacy sparing Liverpool until Cristiano Ronaldo scored his 34th goal of the season and Nani delivered an emphatic victory. “The sending-off gave us control of the game but we were the better team anyway,” said Ferguson. “Rooney had three one-on-ones and Ronaldo missed two excellent chances. We played really well. We did our job.”Rooney ended the game nursing a knee injury which could prompt his withdrawal from Wednesday’s friendly in Paris, although he did report for England duty. Torres is expected to miss Spain’s friendly against Italy having been substituted because of rib and ankle injuries. First published on Sun 23 Mar 2008 22.35 EDTlast_img read more

This Week On FCPA Professor

first_imgElevate your FCPA knowledge and practical skills at the FCPA Institute – Phoenix on January 17-18, 2019. Click here to learn more and register. FCPA Professor has been described as “the Wall Street Journal concerning all things FCPA-related,” and “the most authoritative source for those seeking to understand and apply the FCPA.”Set forth below are the topics discussed this week on FCPA Professor.This guest post checks in down under and covers a range of developments in Australia and overseas in the area of foreign bribery policy, investigations and regulation.In addition to enforcement activity and legislative developments, the 1980’s also saw much FCPA media coverage on a range of topics and this post excerpts certain articles found in the Wall Street Journal during the 1980s.FCPA Professor will once again be the place to visit in January for numerous 2018 year in review statistics. But first, this post closes out the fourth quarter of 2018.This post compares corporate FCPA enforcement in 2018 to prior years. Measured in terms of the number of core corporate actions, 2018 was the third most active year for enforcement in FCPA history.This post highlights the origins of 2018 corporate FCPA enforcement actions.As highlighted here, former Credit Suisse bankers were criminally charged with FCPA and other offenses in connection with various Mozambican maritime projects. This post discusses what it all might mean for Credit Suisse.last_img read more

Gibson Dunn Leads Lone Stars 76 Billion Acquisition

first_img Username Remember me Password Lost your password?center_img The Dallas private equity firm agreed Monday to purchase 41,917 apartment units in 121 different communities from East Coast-based Home Properties for $7.6 billion. Lone Star, which has an estimated $60 billion in assets under management, turned to Jeffrey Chapman, a corporate M&A partner in the Dallas office of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, to lead the transaction . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img read more

Chelan PUD Offering State Park Passes for CustomerOwners

first_imgChelan PUD is again offering a free day-use, parking pass for three state parks that were built by the utility, Confluence, Daroga and Lincoln Rock state parks. Spokesperson Kimberlee Craig says it was offered after their last round of strategic planning five years ago.“It’s important to be able to share access to those state parks with our customer-owners since they are the ones that helped us build those parks. It is offered, truly, as a benefit of sharing some of the great financial times that Chelan PUD has been able to accomplish the past few years.”Craig says in their most recent strategic planning sessions, this particular benefit is popular and many people want it to stick around.2,000 people in recent years have used the pass to visit and Craig says they are hoping more people come this year.“Folks can apply for a parking pass either at ChelanPUD.org under parks and recreation or they can come to our offices in Wenatchee, Chelan and Leavenworth and fill out an application there.”The passes are good through the end of 2019.last_img read more

Dont Be an Instigator

first_imgby, Chris Perna, The Eden Alternative BlogTweetShareShareEmail0 Shares Chris Perna, CEO of The Eden Alternative When I was growing up, my mother would often use the word instigator to describe my bad behavior. If I was bothering my sister or trying to pick a fight, she would frequently say, “Don’t be an instigator!!!” That meant back off and don’t make trouble.As a parent, I now understand where she was coming from. She had enough to worry about without my making her life more difficult. However, as an adult and as a business leader, I also understand that instigators are a necessary and important part of our lives. Dr. Bill Thomas is by my definition of the ultimate instigator.Dr. Bill has been busy making waves lately with his abolitionist point of view on nursing homes. I think it’s important to note that he is not picking on anyone personally, nor is he ignoring the efforts of the thousands of people who have put their heart and soul into caring for elders in their corner of the world. Instead, I believe he is taking a position against the institution known as a nursing home, saying it needs to go because the majority of nursing homes still don’t get this thing called culture change. He has resorted to using bolder terms because he is an instigator.While some may disagree with his tactics, I believe there is value in having Bill as an instigator. He challenges us to look at the elder care situation differently, and while it is not comfortable for some, it is an important part of the process. Without an instigator’s poking and prodding, there are many advances in our society that would have been missed. Our lives would be different, and our well-being certainly diminished were it not for instigators like Dr. Bill. If you step back for a minute, you could think of several such people in history.At The Eden Alternative, we remain committed to helping those people and organizations that want to make change happen and create a life worth living for elders and their care partners. We will work with you to do this hard work and support you any way we can, drawing from many hard lessons learned over the past 20 years.I know Dr. Bill wants us to continue with our mission, while at the same time he is willing to play the role of instigator to achieve the kind of change needed to improve elder care and our societal views on aging on a much larger scale than has been possible so far.Related PostsInterview with Geriatrician, Eden Alternative Founder, and Author Bill ThomasBill Thomas is a very busy man. He is the founder of the Eden Alternative that has been on the forefront of transforming nursing homes into elder-centered communities.  He developed the Green House Project, which focuses on replacing institu…ChangingAging Blogstream Weekly Roundup May 28 to June 3Get Ready for TEDxSF With ChangingAging’s Elderhood Rising Series Watch Dr. Bill Thomas’ TEDxSF Talk Live Online! By ChangingAging Dr. Bill Thomas makes his TEDx debut Saturday, June 4, and you can watch it live via streaming video from the TEDxSF Alive! Maximum Living as a Human event in San…The Culture Change Movement Is OverThe second half of my working life stretches out in front of me and I no longer feel the need to censor my words and my deeds. I am a nursing home abolitionist and, going forward, I intend to act like one.TweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: Care Partner Innovation The Eden Alternativelast_img read more

Mindfulnessbased Stress Management Course for cancer survivors

first_imgMay 18 2018Cancer, like so many other overwhelming or life-altering situations, can really stick with a person. For many, the end of treatment is met with a flood of emotions that can make it difficult to get back to normal life. Learning how to recognize and live with a cancer diagnosis is a struggle that can last for years even after being given a clean bill of health. For Penn patient Catherine Hagele, the end of treatment was simply the end of one chapter in her journey, and the beginning of another.At age 50, Catherine led a pretty healthy life, as she always had, so when she found a lump in her breast in February 2017, she was thrown. “I had no family history of cancer. None,” she said. “I know cancer can happen to anyone, but it was just never something that was on my radar as a possibility.”Catherine, a trainer with Penn’s Standardized Patient Program – which trains specialists to portray patients in medical situations for the purposes of teaching clinical skills to medical students, residents, fellows and other professionals – called her doctor and made an appointment to have the lump checked right away. “I was diagnosed with stage one triple negative breast cancer, and from that moment, I went into survival mode,” she said. Through surgery, 16 weeks of chemotherapy, and 4.5 weeks of radiation, Catherine and her husband focused on just getting through treatment. “We just put our heads down, put one foot in front of the other, and did what we had to do to get through it.”And then… it was over. “Just like that, I was done,” she said. Her oncologist, Kevin Fox, MD, director of the Rena Rowan Breast Center at the Abramson Cancer Center, warned her that the next six months could be tough. Trying to re-acclimate to normal, daily life after a cancer diagnosis wasn’t the weightless, seeing-life-in-a-whole-new-way kind of experience Catherine had expected. There was anxiety – sometimes crushing – and stress.Stress affects “your whole biology and cognition in a way that is not helpful. When you really notice it clearly, it stops running the show,” Michael Baime, MD, a clinical associate professor of Medicine and director of the Penn Program for Mindfulness, told the Philadelphia Inquirer.Even after treatment Catherine was worried about the future, and had a persistent heaviness of all the feelings she hadn’t had time to process while she was busy just trying to survive.”You feel so well cared for while you’re going through it. Everyone from the parking attendants to your doctors and nurses make you feel supported. But then, you’re just done, and you’re let loose to go back to your regular life,” Catherine said. “Going back to regular life is strange. It’s like everything is filtered through the lens of the diagnosis. It’s hard not to feel a little bit lost when all the feelings you hadn’t had time to acknowledge suddenly hit you all at once.”Catherine wanted to celebrate. She was relieved and grateful that her cancer had been caught early and could be treated. She knew it could have been so much worse, but still, her anxiety was overwhelming. That is, until she found a flyer for the Penn Program for Mindfulness in the mix of other support and resource materials she received during her treatment.Catherine had never practiced meditation or mindfulness before, and had never really considered it, either. But, when her father-in-law gave her a generous sum and told her to spend it on something for herself, Catherine thought, “If mindfulness isn’t something for yourself, what is?””I didn’t want to use this gift on something like clothes,” she said. “My father-in-law said it was for me – just me – and I wanted to use it on something that would be positive, and would help me be my best self.”Related StoriesEmbrace your natural skin tone to prevent skin cancer, say expertsNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerCatherine signed up for the Mindfulness-based Stress Management Course, part of the Program for Mindfulness which was established by Baime in 1992 and has since trained more than 15,000 people. Stress management, she thought, was exactly what she needed. Still, she was skeptical. Understanding how to deal with all that stress and anxiety seemed like a tall order.When we are stressed, Baime says, our attention becomes hijacked by loops of thoughts that remind us of all the disasters that are in store. “If you could watch your mind, you would find it’s ping-ponging all over the place,” he said. “But, if you notice how you feel when you are not stressed, the attention is steady and stable and fully present. With a little bit of practice, we can realize that steadiness is part of what we are, and we can connect with it even as everything else is crazy.”For eight weeks, Catherine attended group sessions with others who were also dealing with trying times – some were working through issues with pain management, going through a divorce, or had been diagnosed with cancer, but most were just looking for more peace in their lives. Though at first she feared the group setting would make it feel more like therapy and the group did in fact share their personal stories and journeys, Catherine said it was “an intensely private experience.”The class, she said, started with “baby steps,” which included the commitment to practicing mindfulness for 40 minutes every day. “It seemed like a lot at first,” she said, adding, “I thought maybe five minutes would be a good challenge.” But, as she quickly learned, the course instructors arm participants with tools and exercises to help with practice and learning the basics of being mindful.Baime says the reason people turn to mindfulness is because “it enhances their experience of depth, meaning, and connection in their life.” And when it comes to stress, that may be the best antidote around. “On the surface, it seems as though the goal of mindfulness is to calm people and help them cope with difficult circumstances. But in fact, it often works the opposite way, giving them strength and clarity.”That was certainly Catherine’s experience. Simply learning to acknowledge her feelings, she says, made her feel as though she could do something about them.”I don’t know that I’m less stressed, or feel less anxiety,” she said. “Mindfulness doesn’t take away from what life is – stressful, messy, and emotional at times – but I have a new confidence and tangible tools to handle it. I learned how much I want to be in the moment that ‘is’ and not be stuck in the past or worry about the future. I don’t want to miss ‘now’ by being worried about what happened or what will happen.”The reason recognizing those feelings is so key to managing them, Baime says, is because when you’re upset, anxious, or stressed, your attention accelerates, and your whole being becomes a very active, energized system. But, when you learn to practice mindfulness, you learn to stabilize that attention, giving yourself a chance to see what’s really happening and make better choices.The practice of mindfulness, Baime says, is growing exponentially, with studies showing it cuts negative emotions by almost half. For Catherine, who recently signed up for her second eight-week course, the only regret is how her journey could have been changed had she started the class sooner.”I do wonder how it might have changed how I experienced everything if I’d started the class as soon as I was diagnosed,” she says. “I’m still me, but it feels like a life change. Cancer is life-changing, but the journey you go through after treatment can be life-changing, too.” Source:https://www.upenn.edu/last_img read more

Dementia home designed with hitech features showcases how patients can live independently

first_img Clear lines of sight and use of color through the home help guide people towards specific rooms and reduce the risk for slips and trips Increased natural lighting, which has been shown to help people stay alert during the day and to sleep better at night Noise reduction features, to reduce stress and agitation. A ‘talking cushion’ with inbuilt sensors to remind people to get up, walk around and get a drink because walking is beneficial for health and dehydration can cause cognitive problems Homely, simple and familiar interior design to help promote rest and relaxation Space to install a lift so the lounge does not become a bedroom when the stairs become difficult Source:http://www.lboro.ac.uk/media-centre/press-releases/2018/july/dementia-house-launch/ One of the home’s more hi-tech features is an Acti-chair, which includes resistance bands with inbuilt sensors to guide strength, speed and direction of movement.The chair was co-designed by Delft University of Technology and Loughborough’s Living Laboratory in partnership with people with dementia – using a simple system with emoji for feedback.The Acti-chair not only promotes physical well-being but also improves memory by encouraging repetition of exercise patterns.”Strength exercises can improve memory, even with three 30 minute sessions a week,” said Professor Eef Hogervorst, an expert in early dementia diagnoses and lifetime risk and protection.”Many older people are sedentary and people with dementia often spend most of their time at home, which can enhance memory problems.”Loughborough’s research by Jordan Elliott King and others shows that exercise promotes memory function and independence, also in people with dementia – so any features which encourage the uptake of activities, including the ‘talking cushions’, are key in the design of the house.”Professor Hogervorst said that technology like the personas, ‘talking cushion’ and Acti-chair combined with the latest understanding of the condition is what makes the house an important step forward in dementia care.”There are lots of small, simple changes people can make to their homes which will help with better independent living.”The beauty of this project is that we’ve been able to create and adapt new technologies to support the knowledge we already have.”Other technological advances include intelligent climate control and ventilation.Professor Malcolm Cook and Dr Dashamir Marini, of Loughborough School of Civil and Building Engineering, have created a system which maintains the home at the optimum temperature and ensures enough fresh air gets into the house at all times of the day.Dr Marini said: “Our goal was identical to any good house design – to develop a building that provides natural ventilation, space heating and domestic hot water.”Ideal room temperature, air flow and climate should be the same for people with and without dementia – providing good thermal comfort and minimize energy consumption is a universal expectation.”The only difference is, that with this design, we have incorporated an intelligent thermostat which monitors and adjusts itself in case of user-related errors, such as repeatedly turning up the temperature.”Related StoriesOU Health Sciences Center awarded federal grant to enhance dementia care across OklahomaA program of therapy and coping strategies works long-term for family dementia carersDementia patients hospitalized and involved in transitional care at higher ratesLike all of the academics involved in the house, Dr Marini and Prof Cook will continue to collect data from the building, when it is occupied, to allow them to constantly refine their research and improve the home’s features.The house will continue to provide invaluable data about interactions with technology and day-to-day living patterns and routines of any inhabitants.”The house will be an invaluable tool for understanding numerous aspects of how people with dementia cope in an independent setting,” said Professor Hogervorst. “Everything we learn will go into improving the lives of people with the condition as well as back into the BRE home to make it an ever-evolving and progressing project.”The demonstration house cost £300,000 to create, but the figure is not reflective of the amount people will have to spend to incorporate many of the ideas in their own homes.As well as the hi-tech facets, the home is packed with simple, inexpensive solutions to the problems faced by people with dementia.General adapted living features include non-scalding faucets, self-closing fridge doors, glass cabinets, simple switches, large clocks and furniture with no protruding corners to minimize injuries from falls.Other design ideas focus on reducing accidents and confusion and promoting independence, by using good light, have adequate contrast between floors and walls and no loose rugs or fittings.The house has been designed to show adaptations for different stages of the disease.Professor Sue Hignett, Charlotte Jais and Prof Hogervorst devised a number of personas, each with specific care needs, which have been used to guide the design and features of the house.The main narrative of the project is based on the care needs of Chris and Sally – a couple living with the progressive stages of dementia.Professor Hignett said: “Providing care and treatment at home presents challenges for people living with dementia whether care is delivered from one or multiple organizations or within different models of home care, for example, the hospital in the home, patient-centered medical home, home first policies and aging-in-place.”We know that a well-designed care environment can improve quality of life and enable independence.”For this research, we considered a range of activities, including personal hygiene, mobilization, and nutrition, as well as later stage nursing care for medication administration, tube feeding, and more home care technology – for example a ventilator or electric wheelchair.”We used scientific information to create descriptions and videos to bring the voices of the people living with different stages of dementia to help communicate their abilities, limitations and preferences.”The personas focussed on the symptoms, care requirements and design needs of four fictitious sufferers at different stages of dementia – Alison, Barry, Christine and David.Each persona demonstrates good and bad days and allows families to identify at what stage of the disease they’re loved ones are closest to, and subsequently seek the correct care.Professor Hignett said: “This research was needed because we know that dementia design guidelines have been criticized for mostly relying on professional consensus and stakeholder opinions than robust research evidence.”Our design is firmly based on robust scientific evidence.”Dementia care costs families around £18 billion a year and affects about 850,000 people in the UK. The figure is expected to rise to more than one million in the UK by 2025.Two-thirds of the cost of dementia is paid by those who suffer from the condition and their families.This is in contrast to other conditions, such as heart disease and cancer, where the NHS provides care that is free at the point of use.Calculating the savings made by adapting people’s homes would depend on a case-by-case basis.BRE spokesperson Dr David Kelly said the average cost of dementia care in the UK is between £30,000 to £40,000 per annum.He said: “Many of the ideas put forward in the prototype home are just good sense for us all to incorporate into our properties to adapt to the process of aging.”Creating environments which allow people to live independently at home for longer could save a significant amount.”That money could instead be channeled into research that alleviates the condition and reduces the emotional stress to the individual.”center_img Jul 6 2018A show home designed around concepts and technologies which will allow people with dementia to live independently for longer has been officially opened.The house, at the BRE Innovation Park, in Watford, features a vast collection of intuitive ideas, all based on proven academic research, from simple open-plan living spaces to more hi-tech innovations such ‘talking cushions’, which promote activity after long periods of rest, sensory ‘smart chairs’, self-regulating climate control and safety sensors in high risk areas, such as the kitchen.All of the features in the home were designed around a range of unique personas, created especially for the project, which reflect four progressive stages of dementia, from early on-set to end-of-life.The converted 100sqm Victorian semi has been unveiled to 150 invited guests, all with an interest in dementia or health care, and television, radio and print journalists.Lord Richard Best, Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Housing and Care for Older People, was the guest of honor and gave a short talk before the ribbon was cut, on Wednesday, July 4.The innovations and ideas have been devised by experts at Loughborough University, BRE and HLP Architects.The house is open to the public, care-providers, local authorities, architects and anyone with an interest in dementia care to allow them to gather ideas, solutions and inspiration from the technology and design on show.Examples of features include:last_img read more

Does the Sky Have a Faulty Filter

Normally, the amount of ozone in the stratosphere ranges from 30 to 100 ozone particles per billion air molecules. But the researchers, led by AWI atmospheric scientist Markus Rex, found levels in the west Pacific below 10 ozone particles per billion—so low their instruments couldn’t even get a precise count. “The first sonde I really thought was malfunctioning,” Rex says. “We didn’t expect to see such a deep and wide hole in terms of ozone.” But measurements over a 3000-km-wide swath, and up to an altitude of 15 km, showed that the dearth of ozone reached all the way up to the lower stratosphere. This indicates that OH levels in the troposphere may be much lower than previously thought, and their filtering effect less pronounced, the team will report in an upcoming issue of Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.The finding could have broad impacts on our understanding of how the stratosphere works, says James Anderson, an atmospheric chemist at Harvard University. If the troposphere’s OH filter is indeed less effective than scientists thought, he says, the west Pacific would provide “a potentially very important avenue for the injection” of pollutants that could damage the ozone layer. And it could explain why past studies measured higher than expected levels of ozone-damaging chemicals in the stratosphere, Rex says. For example, “we always knew there is more bromine in the stratosphere than we could account for.” A miscalculation of the OH filter’s strength may explain the discrepancy.The climate implications could be broad as well. Sulfur aerosol pollution, created via coal burning, is skyrocketing in Southeast Asia. In the stratosphere, sulfates provide a temporary cooling mask that spreads globally and lasts a few years. If Rex is right, it could mean that cooling pollutants have an easier route to the stratosphere than previously thought, though his study doesn’t calculate the specific climate impacts of the faulty filter.Other researchers are unconvinced. Atmospheric scientist Laura Pan of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, says the ozone measurements are just a suggestion of OH levels in the troposphere, not proof. More data, including measurements of other gases that affect OH levels, can confirm the OH levels, she says. She recently completed a field campaign in the same west Pacific region using aircraft that will give more data on the issue, but results are not yet available. The team from AWI, meanwhile, will soon begin a €5 million project off Palau in the west Pacific, funded by the European Union, to take more measurements of atmospheric chemicals that will help it estimate OH levels better.*Correction, 28 April, 12:43 p.m.: This item incorrectly asserted that Laura Pan stated that measuring OH directly was required to confirm low levels of the chemical. The item has been updated. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Just when scientists thought the ozone layer’s worst days were behind it, it turns out they may have been missing a big threat to its health. Soon-to-be-published findings suggest that a natural mechanism that filters air rising to the top of the sky may not work as well as previously thought. If subsequent studies confirm the findings, the faulty filter could also have big implications for global climate.The sky is divided into two major layers: the troposphere close to Earth’s surface and the stratosphere, which in the tropics begins 17,000 meters above it. In addition to providing the air we breathe and the weather we experience, the troposphere is laced with a compound called the hydroxyl radical—abbreviated OH—which bonds to pollutants like bromines and droplets of sulfates called aerosols. It neutralizes most of them before they can reach the stratosphere, preventing them from damaging the ozone layer and wreaking havoc on global climate.But new work led by scientists at the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) in Potsdam, Germany, suggests that the OH filter may not be as reliable as previously thought. In 2009, AWI scientists conducted a research cruise in the west Pacific, where strong thunderstorms push air from the troposphere up to the stratosphere, serving as a main source of air for the upper layer. Because ozone in the troposphere is a precursor to OH, they deployed weather balloons equipped with measuring devices known as sondes to measure the amount of ozone in the air from the surface to the stratosphere. The more ozone they found, they thought, the higher the level of OH, a chemical notoriously difficult to measure directly. read more

Asteroid paper to be retracted because of faulty analysis

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emailcenter_img TOKYO—The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) announced on Friday that it is asking Science to withdraw one of the 2006 papers that resulted from the Hayabusa asteroid sample return mission because of an error in the data analysis. The retraction won’t affect scientists’ understanding of the asteroid, however, because other papers have confirmed the study’s key conclusions.The Japanese-led team published a collection of seven papers in a special issue of Science on 2 June 2006 based on observations by four instruments as the Hayabusa spacecraft circled asteroid Itokawa in the fall of 2005. The craft later touched down to grab samples. The paper being retracted, by Tatsuaki Okada and colleagues, presents an analysis of x-ray spectra to determine the elements on the asteroid’s surface. The authors concluded “that Itokawa has a composition consistent with that of ordinary chondrites.” Chondrites are a type of stony asteroid.For various reasons, the authors felt they could not rely on the calibration of the instrument done on Earth before the spacecraft was launched. To compensate, they started by assuming they would see the characteristic x-ray spectra of magnesium and silicon, elements known to be present on ordinary chondrites. They then used what they took to be the spectra of those elements to interpret the instrument’s raw data. In effect, the authors jumped to a conclusion and then based their analysis on what they expected to observe. (Explanatory materials, in Japanese, are here.) The assumption “was a big mistake for scientists, but as humans sometimes we make mistakes,” says Masaki Fujimoto, who heads the solar system science division of JAXA’s Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in Sagamihara. Fujimoto, who was not among the paper’s authors, says the faulty analysis voids the paper’s conclusion. Ironically, he says, an analysis of the dust returned to Earth later revealed that Itokawa actually is an ordinary chondrite, as was reported in a second collection of six Hayabusa-related reports published in Science on 26 August 2011.The error was found during a routine review of the Hayabusa project results looking for lessons to apply to future missions. Investigators concluded there was no research misconduct involved. The authors are now going back over the raw data captured by the spectrometer to see if there would be merit in a new analysis.The Hayabusa mission, launched in May 2003, has resulted in 129 peer-reviewed papers, 14 of which appeared in Science. The Hayabusa ground crew relied on ingenuity and a bit of luck to overcome damaged solar panels, engine failures, fuel leaks, and the complete loss of communications for several months during the craft’s 6-billion-kilometer, 7-year journey. The sample capsule, with its precious cargo, landed in the Australian outback in June 2010. A follow-on mission, Hayabusa 2, is on track to launch in the coming winter.last_img read more

Humans may harbor more than 100 genes from other organisms

first_imgYou’re not completely human, at least when it comes to the genetic material inside your cells. You—and everyone else—may harbor as many as 145 genes that have jumped from bacteria, other single-celled organisms, and viruses and made themselves at home in the human genome. That’s the conclusion of a new study, which provides some of the broadest evidence yet that, throughout evolutionary history, genes from other branches of life have become part of animal cells.“This means that the tree of life isn’t the stereotypical tree with perfectly branching lineages,” says biologist Alastair Crisp of the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, an author of the new paper. “In reality, it’s more like one of those Amazonian strangler figs where the roots are all tangled and crossing back across each other.”Scientists knew that horizontal gene transfer—the movement of genetic information between organisms other than parent-to-offspring inheritance—is commonplace in bacteria and simple eukaryotes. The process lets the organisms quickly share an antibiotic-resistance set of genes to adapt to an antibiotic, for instance. But whether genes have been horizontally transferred into higher organisms—like primates—has been disputed. Like in bacteria, it’s been proposed that animal cells could integrate foreign genetic material that’s introduced as small fragments of DNA or carried into cells by viruses. But proving that a bit of DNA in the human genome originally came from another organism is tricky. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emailcenter_img Crisp and his colleagues analyzed the genome sequences of 40 different animal species, ranging from fruit flies and roundworms to zebrafish, gorillas, and humans. For each gene in the genomes, the scientists searched existing databases to find close matches—both among other animals and among nonanimals, including plants, fungi, bacteria, and viruses. When an animal’s gene more closely matched a gene from a nonanimal than any other animals, the researchers took a closer look, using computational methods to determine whether the initial database search had missed something.In all, the researchers pinpointed hundreds of genes that appeared to have been transferred from bacteria, archaea, fungi, other microorganisms, and plants to animals, they report online today in Genome Biology. In the case of humans, they found 145 genes that seemed to have jumped from simpler organisms, including 17 that had been reported in the past as possible horizontal gene transfers.“I think what this shows it that horizontal gene transfer is not just confined to microorganisms but has played a role in the evolution of many animals,” Crisp says, “perhaps even all animals.The paper doesn’t give any hints as to how the genes—which now play established roles in metabolism, immune responses, and basic biochemistry—may have been transferred or the exact timeline of the jumps, he says. That will take more work.The findings are critical to understanding evolution, says Hank Seifert, a molecular biologist at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois. “This is a very well-done paper. They used all the latest data they could find, all the genomes in the databases,” he says. “It makes it clearer than ever that there has been a history, throughout evolution, of gene transfer between organisms.”But not all agree that the new evidence is indisputable. “I see little here that is particularly convincing evidence for horizontal gene transfer,” says microbiologist Jonathan Eisen of the University of California, Davis. He doesn’t rule out that horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and animals is possible, but says that there are other explanations for the identified genes being present in only some branches of the evolutionary tree—a gene that existed in a far-off ancestor could have simply been lost in many relatives other than two seemingly unrelated species, for instance. “It is up to [the researchers] to exclude other, more plausible alternatives, and I just do not think they have done that.”*Correction, 16 March, 12:37 p.m.: The piece has been updated to clarify the fact that bacteria are not eukaryotes. 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Heartland danger zones emerge on new US earthquake hazard map

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email The gentle landscape of southern Kansas doesn’t exactly shout “earthquake country.” Until recently, the notoriously flat state had just two of the seismic stations used for recording and locating earthquakes. Now, 21 are in place. They have been sorely needed. Since 2013, 192 earthquakes bigger than magnitude 2 have hit Harper and Sumner counties, on the border with Oklahoma, up from just two in the previous 35 years. “It feels like we’re on the front lines of this thing,” says Rex Buchanan, the state geologist for the Kansas Geological Survey in Lawrence.Across the U.S. heartland, an oil and gas boom has driven a surge of small to moderate earthquakes. Scientists say that deep underground injection of wastewater from oil and gas operations is triggering the tremors by pushing critically stressed faults past the snapping point. On 23 April, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) released a report that, for the first time, accounts for these human-caused, or induced, earthquakes in a map of seismic hazards across the country. The new map highlights 17 areas in eight states with frequent induced earthquakes (see boxed areas on map). The probability of dangerous levels of ground shaking in some of these areas, such as the one that bleeds from central Oklahoma into southern Kansas, rivals that of California, the traditional earthquake king. “It was kind of a surprise,” says Mark Petersen, chief of the USGS National Seismic Hazard Mapping Project in Golden, Colorado.So far, most induced earthquakes have done no more than rattle windows. But a few have been big enough to damage buildings, and now USGS says that it can’t rule out the possibility of a magnitude-7 temblor, which would cause widespread damage. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country USGS researchers had to develop new methods to make the map. Typically, in predicting future earthquake behavior, they assume that past is prologue. In places like California, where quakes are set off by well-understood forces that cause tectonic plates to grind past each other, seismologists can invoke centuries of earthquake statistics. But for the new, induced earthquake regions, the researchers modeled the future hazard based on tremors only in the past year. They also predicted the hazard just 1 year into the future, rather than offering the usual 50-year prediction.That short time window is a challenge for engineers who design bridges and buildings meant to last decades, as it says nothing about the hazards a structure will face over its lifetime. Peterson isn’t sure how engineers will use the new information, but he says the agency couldn’t be confident in longer term predictions when so many factors—the price of oil, the actions of regulators—could influence earthquake rates.Some of these feedback loops may already be having an effect. The price of oil has dropped drastically in the past year, and many operations are slowing down or shuttering. Some states are also beginning to crack down. On 19 March, Kansas’s regulator, the Kansas Corporation Commission, issued an order that would reduce saltwater injection in Harper and Sumner counties by up to 60% for some wells—its first response to specific wells that seem to be triggering quakes. Buchanan says that April has been the quietest month for his state since August 2014, with just six earthquakes. “It’s been a little bit of a roller coaster ride over the last 18 months,” he says.last_img read more